Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I am working on a groovy application that requires me to highlight(add spans) to the word that is searched for.For instance given the text below :

youtube

[href="youtube.com] i am here , in Youtube[/a]

I want to search for the word "youtube" and when it returned the above text should look like this :

[span]youtube[span]

[href="youtube.com] i am here , in [span]Youtube[/span]  [/a]

The youtube word that is contained in the href or in the iframe must be ignored. At the moment I have the following code :

def m = test =~ /([^<]*)?(youtube)/
println m[0]

def highLightText  = { attrs, body ->
        def postBody = attrs.text
        def m = postBody =~ /(?i:${attrs.searchTerm})/
        def array = []

        m.each{
            array << it as String
        }
        array.unique()

        String result = postBody
        array.each{
            result = result.replaceAll("${it}", "<span class='highlight'>${it}</span>")

        }

        out << result
    }

And it returns :

[span]youtube[span]

[href="[span]youtube[span].com] i am here , in [span]Youtube[/span]  [/a]

Can anyone help me with a regular expression that can select only words that are not contained in links or other tags.

Thanks

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

A maintainable solution is unlikely to be achievable using regular expressions - the problem is too complex.

Parse your HTML into a DOM and consider only text nodes as being suitable for potential highlighting. Text nodes will, by definition, be only those pieces of content that are rendered and will not be element names, attributes/attribute values and so on.

The complexity of your problem is then reduced down to: how to do I find and highlight a string within another string?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.