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Help me solving the above problem.

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closed as not a real question by Mat, Jonas, woodchips, davin, Tomasz Nurkiewicz May 7 '11 at 12:30

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it is proven that there is no close formula for n>=5. do you mean you are looking for a numerical approximation? –  amit May 7 '11 at 12:14
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3 Answers

as I said in the comment it is proven that there is no algorithm for n>=5.
however, you can find a numerical approximation (i.e. Newton`s Method)

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No formula using radical does not imply there is no algorithm for solving the problem. Abel himself solved the quintic using theta functions. I believe the hypergeometric functions can be used to solve any polynomial. –  Aryabhatta May 7 '11 at 16:00
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If n >= 5, then according to Galois Theory, there exists no algorithm to analytically solve the polynom.

However, you can use numerical analysis to find the roots (e.g. Newton's method in wikipedia or your favorite numerical methods books)

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No formula using radical does not imply there is no algorithm for analytically solving the problem. Abel himself solved the quintic using theta functions. I believe the hypergeometric functions can be used to solve any polynomial. –  Aryabhatta May 7 '11 at 16:00
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For n > 4, you can use Newton's method. Just take 0 as the first guess, and proceed iteratively. Of course this will not work for complex roots.

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Actually, it works for complex roots as well. –  Paxinum Dec 6 '13 at 14:35
    
I do not see how it possibly can. In the example of say f(X)=X^2+1, Newton's method gives an iterative solution g(X)=X-f(X)/f'(X)=X- –  Philip Sheard Dec 6 '13 at 18:00
    
I do not see how it possibly can. In the example of say f(X)=X^2+1, Newton's method gives an iterative solution g(X)=X-f(X)/f'(X)=X-(X^2+1)/2X=(X^2-1)/2X, so if X0 is real, then so is Xn for all n. Intuitively it does not make any sense either. –  Philip Sheard Dec 6 '13 at 18:18
    
You get different roots depending on start value. So, if you start with a complex initial value, you may get complex roots. See picture here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton_fractal All the red parts in the complex plane converge to a real root, but the other parts do not. These starting values converges to the two other roots of x³-1. –  Paxinum Dec 7 '13 at 0:56
    
Thanks for the reference. I never thought that anyone would be stupid enough to try to solve a two-dimensional problem using a one-dimensional method, but I am clearly wrong. –  Philip Sheard Dec 7 '13 at 6:26
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