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int main () {

   char b[100];
   for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++ )
       scanf ("%c%*c", b[i]);
}

but am getting the error 'Format arguemnt is not a pointer'

How can i declare an array to get all values form the user?

EDIT :

#include <cstdio>
#include <stdlib.h>

using namespace std;


int p[100], b, bc;
char bb[100];

int main () {


        printf("Enter Count : ");
        scanf ("%d", &bc);
        for (b = 1; b <= bc; b++ ) {
            printf("Enter a char and integer: ");
            scanf ("%c%*c %d", &bb[b-1], &p[b-1]);
            printf ("\n Your Entries =>  %c,  %d", bb[b-1], p[b-1]);
        }


    return 0;
}

This is my source code.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Johannes Schaub - litb, unapersson, Paul R, Bo Persson, Greg S May 7 '11 at 18:33

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
That is not how you write a for-loop in C or C++. –  nbt May 7 '11 at 13:41
    
:) just to showcase how, nothing else.. :) –  coderex May 7 '11 at 13:42
    
why -ve mark? what ? –  coderex May 7 '11 at 13:50
    
for what reason you guys closing this? –  coderex May 7 '11 at 14:00
    
Your declaration is ok. Try char b[100]; fgets(b, sizeof b, stdin); ... and post real compilable (or very nearly compilable) code. –  pmg May 7 '11 at 14:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#include <cstdio>

Apparently, you're coding in C++

#include <stdlib.h>

Oh! Wait. It is C after all.
@coderex: make up your mind what language you're using

using namespace std;

Oh! It is C++. My answer does not consider the C++ specifics which I don't know.

int p[100], b, bc;
char bb[100];

If you can avoid using global variables, your code will be easier to deal with.

int main () {


        printf("Enter Count : ");
        scanf ("%d", &bc);
        for (b = 1; b <= bc; b++ ) {

The idiomatic way is for (b = 0; b < bc; b++). Using the idiomatic way, you won't need to subtract 1 inside the loop to access the array indexes.

            printf("Enter a char and integer: ");
            // scanf ("%c%*c %d", &bb[b-1], &p[b-1]);

scanf() is notoriously difficult to use correctly.
Anyway the "%d" conversion specifier already discards whitespace so you can remove the strange stuff; also there's an ENTER pending from the last scanf call. Using a space in the format string gets rid of it.

            scanf (" %c%d", &bb[b-1], &p[b-1]);
            printf ("\n Your Entries =>  %c,  %d", bb[b-1], p[b-1]);
        }


    return 0;
}

Have fun!

share|improve this answer
    
after 8 year gap I'm using C/C++. :) –  coderex May 7 '11 at 14:54
    
I recommend you stick with one of C or C++ (or C#, or D, ...). Don't try to write a multi-language source file. LOL –  pmg May 7 '11 at 14:56
    
:) yea sure :) anyway tanQx –  coderex May 7 '11 at 15:52

How about:

scanf("%c", &b[i]);

scanf() needs to know the address of the variable, so that it can modify it.

share|improve this answer
    
no there is no error now, but when i tried to print its not showing –  coderex May 7 '11 at 13:48
    
I need "%c%*c" this because I want to read an integer after each char, other wise the newline entry will break the execution –  coderex May 7 '11 at 13:49
1  
@coderex: Yes, you may need to modify this for your exact requirements. My code snippet above was to demonstrate the need to provide an address. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 7 '11 at 13:49
    
then how will i print this? –  coderex May 7 '11 at 13:52
1  
@coderex: I cannot help you unless you provide some actual code. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 7 '11 at 13:57

Error was, its reading the "enter key" as newline char after an integer value enter.

to avoid this I used %*c scanf ("%c%*c %d%*c", &bb[b-1], &p[b-1]);

thank you everybody.

share|improve this answer
    
See my answer ... but scanf(" %c%d", &bb[b - 1], &p[b - 1]); "works" and is easier on the eyes and brain. –  pmg May 7 '11 at 14:59

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