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Consider the following code pattern:

// Each foo keeps a reference to its manager
class Foo
{
    private FooManager m_manager;
}

// Manager keeps a list of all foos
class FooManager
{
    private List<Foo> m_foos;
}

Problem: there is no way to create a new Foo and update both m_foos list in the FooManager, and m_manager reference in the new Foo instance without exposing some privates publicly (and running the risk of someone desyncing the list with actual Foos).

E.g. one could implement a constructor Foo(FooManager manager) in Foo. It could set m_manager reference, but it has no way to access the m_foos list. Or you could implement CreateFoo() method in the manager. It can access m_foos list, but it has no way to set m_manager in Foo.

In C++, one would obviously declare FooManager a friend of Foo to express the design intent, but this is not possible in C#. I also know that I could make Foo an inner class of FooManager to gain access, but this is not a solution either (what if Foo could belong to more than one manager class?)

Btw. I know about "internal" access in .NET, but it requires that Foo and FooManager live on their own in a separate assembly, which is not acceptable.

Any workarounds for that without making private stuff public?

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2  
There's always the InternalsVisibleToAttribute, but that sounds like an hack. How about hiding stuff behind an interface? –  Simon Svensson May 7 '11 at 14:18
    
How would such an interface look like without allowing the user to make m_foos and m_manager to go out of sync? –  kaalus May 7 '11 at 15:56
    
Can FooManager be turned into a factory for Foo? Then the manager knows all the Foo that it created . –  Godeke May 7 '11 at 16:53
    
@Godeke: But how can FooManager change m_manager of Foo without it being accessible publicly? –  kaalus May 7 '11 at 19:19
    
Why would separating to more assemblies be unacceptable? Even if there are other classes in the assembly, they should be friends and to hostiles (or others as some call them). –  Danny Varod May 8 '11 at 20:31

5 Answers 5

If I understand all correctly:

public abstract class FooBus
{
    protected static FooBus m_bus;
}

public sealed class Foo : FooBus
{
    private FooManager m_manager;

    public Foo(FooManager fm)
    {
        if (fm == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("Use FooManager.CreateFoo()");
        }

        if (m_bus != fm)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Use FooManager.CreateFoo()");
        }

        m_manager = fm;
    }
}

public class FooManager : FooBus
{
    private List<Foo> m_foos = new List<Foo>();

    public Foo CreateFoo()
    {
        m_bus = this;
        Foo f = new Foo(this);
        m_foos.Add(f);
        m_bus = null;

        return f;
    }
}
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1  
What's with the FooManager fm in the signature for CreateFoo? –  Chris May 7 '11 at 14:38
    
@Chris thanks, copypasting error, fixed :) –  Petr Abdulin May 7 '11 at 15:50
2  
Well, that is not a good solution because someone can call new Foo() directly, and m_foos list will be invalid. (Btw I understand there's public in front of Foo constructor) –  kaalus May 7 '11 at 15:53
    
@kaalus you're right this solution doesn't work, but can't figure out something better yet. –  Petr Abdulin May 7 '11 at 16:23
    
@kaalus another try, check it out. –  Petr Abdulin May 7 '11 at 17:22

One option would be to use a private nested class for Foo that implements a public interface:

public interface IFoo
{
    // Foo's interface
}

public sealed class FooManager
{
    private readonly List<Foo> _foos = new List<Foo>();

    public IFoo CreateFoo()
    {
        var foo = new Foo(this);
        _foos.Add(foo);
        return foo;
    }

    private class Foo : IFoo
    {
        private readonly FooManager _manager;

        public Foo(FooManager manager)
        {
            _manager = manager;
        }
    }
}

As the Foo class is a private nested class, it can't be created outside the FooManager, and so FooManager's CreateFoo() method ensures that everything stays in-sync.

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This is a good try. But what if I wanted to have Foo added to more than 1 manager class? I cannot make Foo a private inner class of 2 other classes :-( Also, this solution requires me to duplicate declarations (both in interface and actual Foo), and it makes all calls slower by requiring them to go through an interface. This would all be unneccesary if friend was available in C#. –  kaalus May 8 '11 at 9:43
1  
On your first point, you can make FooManager a base class of your other manager classes. The base class could then provide the CreateFoo() method, and store the relationship. On your second, that's not how interfaces work, and exposing functionality through interfaces is good programming practice. –  Iridium May 8 '11 at 10:58

What you can do is create your classes inside a different kind of namespace, let's call it a "module" (don't be fooled by the class keyword, this is not a real class):

public static partial class FooModule {

  // not visible outside this "module"
  private interface IFooSink {
    void Add(Foo foo);
  }

  public class Foo {
    private FooManager m_manager;
    public Foo(FooManager manager) {
      ((IFooSink)manager).Add(this);
      m_manager = manager;
    }
  }

  public class FooManager : IFooSink {
    private List<Foo> m_foos = new List<Foo>();
    void IFooSink.Add(Foo foo) {
      m_foos.Add(foo);
    }
  }

}

Since the "module" is a partial class, you can still create other members inside it in other files in the same compilation unit.

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How about having a base class:

class FooBase
{
     protected static readonly Dictionary<Foo,FooManager> _managerMapping = new Dictionary<Foo,FooManager>();
}

Then Foo and FooManager have FooBase as base class and can update their mapping without exposing it externally. Then you can be sure that no one will alter this collection from outside.

Then in Foo you have a property Manager that will return the manager associated with it and similar, a Foos property in Manager that will give all Foos.

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The same issue as with Petr in another answer: what stops someone else inheriting FooBase and messing around with _managerMapping? Also, this is quite heavyweight performance wise - dictionary lookup instead of a simple member access that we would have if friend was available in C# –  kaalus May 8 '11 at 9:38

In this example the only ones that can get the relationship out of sync is the Foo and the Manager themselves. CreateFoo() is called on the manager to create a "managed foo". Someone else can create a Foo but they can't get it to be managed by a manager without the manager "agreeing".

public class Foo
{
    private FooManager m_manager;

    public void SetManager(FooManager manager)
    {
        if (manager.ManagesFoo(this))
        {
            m_manager = manager;
        }
        else
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Use Manager.CreateFoo() to create a managed Foo");
        }
    }
}

public class FooManager
{
    private List<Foo> m_foos = new List<Foo>();

    public Foo CreateFoo()
    {
        Foo foo = new Foo();
        m_foos.Add(foo);
        foo.SetManager(this);

        return foo;
    }

    public bool ManagesFoo(Foo foo)
    {
        return m_foos.Contains(foo);
    }
}
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