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So I am coming back to Java after a few years of .NET programming and I am trying to update my Java knowledge but am having some problems with the now deprecated Date.parse() function that I once knew. I am trying to indiscriminately parse a string to a date. I do NOT want to have to use the SimpleDateFormtter where I need to specify every acceptable format. I just want to do what Date.parse(String anyStringFormat) to get epoch or new Date(String anyStringFormat) to get new date - what these guys used to do. Every document I keep getting directed to says I have to use the SimpleDateFormat with a specified date format. I do not wish to use a specific date format - what is the new way to do this without a specific date format? I must be missing something, as I can't imagine they would remove such a feature.

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@user743115: "I do NOT want to have to use the SimpleDateFormtter where I need to specify every acceptable format." For my part, my interest in helping someone plummets when they bore me with details of what they WANT. That is not relevant. Sometimes programmers have to do what is necessary. After all, that is why they pay us the 'big bucks'. Grin and bare with it. Laugh all the way to the bank. – Andrew Thompson May 7 '11 at 14:51
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How would you parse '04/05/06'? As April 5th 2006? Or as May 4th 2006? Or as May 6th 2004? All 3 are reasonable answers. – Simon Nickerson May 7 '11 at 14:53
    
@Nickerson It doesn't matter - it is going straight to the database where it is correctly formatted by the stored proc. I shouldn't have to format it twice when the first time (in code) it won't ever matter. Just a waste of extra code. Currently it works great if I do new Date(mystring) but does not work following the dateformat.parse. – user743115 May 7 '11 at 14:56
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If you want to just drop it straight into the database then send it through as a String, if that works for you. If you want it as a Date object then you'll have to format it into the Date Object, using the methods discussed above. Alternatively if you want to go back 5 versions of Java then use Date.parse - it's deprecated with sound reasoning, but it will never be removed... so you're welcome to stick with it if you want to stick to the old way and you're happy its safe... – planetjones May 7 '11 at 14:59
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@Tompson - My concern is your interest plummets when you don't offer anything constructive. I have NO NEED to use the formatter. Period. The old way works better than the new way with less code for my NEEDS. I really don't feel the NEED to maintain extra code not ever used. – user743115 May 7 '11 at 14:59
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Every document I keep getting directed to says I have to use the SimpleDateFormat with a specified date format. I do not wish to use a specific date format - what is the new way to do this without a specific date format? I must be missing something, as I can't imagine they would remove such a feature.

You're doing it wrong then. new Date(String) was deprecated for the exact reasons mentioned in the comments, because date strings can be ambiguous and therefore the returned parse value may not be what you (or your user) expects. This is why DateFormat.parse(String) exists.

If you don't want to use SimpleDateFormat because you don't want to have to specify the exact date string format to use, you are free to implement your own subclass of DateFormat and the parse(String) method - but I expect you will have a lot of trouble implementing logic to deal with ambiguous date strings.

edit: If you are sending a String to your database where it will be formatted anyway, then why even bother parsing a String into a java.util.Date in your app? Just send the raw String to the database and you never need to deal with date parsing issues, nor do you waste any CPU cycles on unnecessary parsing.

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It is very possible I am doing it wrong. I am taking a string entered by a user of a plethora of formats (there are a few dozen acceptable formats by the validator). I was trying to change this to a Date object and ultimately a java.sql.date object and pass it to a stored proc as a java.sql.date without having to redo a dozen format checks to match the validators. Since it was already validated in the controller the model just needs to convert it without having to revalidate the format. – user743115 May 7 '11 at 15:09
    
about the edit - the stored proc requires a date. I don't have the ability to change the input parameter type. – user743115 May 7 '11 at 15:11

You need to use SimpleDateFormat (or DateTimeFormat from joda-time).

There are too many options for date formats and you can't count on a method to try all of them. If you want to support more than one format, make a list of supported patterns.

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I was hoping for a good replacement for Date.parse(String) too, but it looks like none exists (or at least not a built in one).

As other comments have said, it was deprecated because parsing date strings could be ambiguous depending on the format. However, that doesn't help you much if you want to be able to parse a wide variety of dates without specifying them all.

So the way I see it, you have three choices:

  1. make SimpleDateFormat for each format you are interested in and then try to parse it into each of them
  2. Make your own implementation of DateFormat that can handle every format that you're interested in
  3. Use Date.parse(String) (or new Date(String)) and just suppress the deprecation warnings.

Personally, for my application, I chose to specify a few format strings and if none of them were matched, I used the deprecated new Date(String) method. I don't like using deprecated methods, but I felt that as a last ditch effort to parse a date that had already failed a few other attempts, it wouldn't hurt.

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