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For every line where I compare a string to another string, I keep getting the error:

No match for 'operator=='

Code:

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>
#include <string>
#include <curses.h>
using namespace std;

int word_number, state, i, x, n;
bool correct[25], playing = true, set_complete, valid, match;
string word, word_list[25], head, upper, body, lower, blanks, input, guessed, alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
size_t found;

void play(), initialize(), print(), validate(), progress();

int main()
{
    initscr();
    while (playing)
    {
        play();
        printw("Would you like to continue playing?");
        input = getch();
        if (input == "n"||input == "N")
        {
            playing = false;
        }
    }
    endwin();
}

void initialize()
{
    if (word_number != 0)
    {
        word_number++;
    }

    if (word_number == 25)
    {
        set_complete = true;
    }
    state = 0;
    head = "";
    upper = "";
    body = "";
    lower = "";
    blanks = "";
    guessed = "";
    word  =  word_list[word_number];
    for (i = 0; i<strlen(word.c_str()); i++)
    {
        blanks += "_";
    }
}

void play()
{
    initialize();
    while(!set_complete)
    {
        start:
        input = getch();
        validate();

    }
}

void validate()
{

    for (i = 0, valid = false; i <= 25; i++)
    {
        if (input == alphabet[i])
        {
            valid = true;
        }
    }

    if (!valid)
    {
        goto start;
    }

    for (i = 0, match = false; i<strlen(guessed.c_str()); i++)
    {
        if (guessed[i] == input)
        {
            match = true;
        }
    }

    if (!match)
    {
        guessed += input;
    }

    for (i = 0, match = false; i<strlen(word.c_str()); i++)
    {
        if (input == word[i])
        {
            blanks[i] = input;
            match = true;
        }
    }

    if (!match)
    {
        state++;
    }
    else
    {
        x++;
    }

    if (x == strlen(word.c_str()))
    {
        correct[word_number] = 1;
        initialize();
    }
}

void print()
{
    switch (state)
    {
        case 1:
        head = "(Q)";
        break;
        case 2:
        upper = " |";
        break;
        case 3:
        upper = "\|";
        break;
        case 4:
        upper = "\|/";
        break;
        case 5:
        body = "|";
        break;
        case 6:
        lower = "/ ";
        break;
        case 7:
        lower = "/ \\";
        break;
        default:
        break;
    }

    printw("   ______\n");
    printw("  /      \\\n");
    printw("  |     %s\n", head.c_str());
    printw("  |    %s\n", upper.c_str());
    printw("  |     %s\n", body.c_str());
    printw("  |    %s\n", lower.c_str());
    printw("__|__\n");
    if (!valid)
    {
        printw("Only lowercase letters are allowed!\n");
        valid = true;
    }
    printw("%s\n", guessed.c_str());
    for (i = 0; i<strlen(word.c_str()); i++)
    {
        printw("%s ", blanks[i].c_str());
    }
    refresh();
}

void progress()
{
    for (i = 0; i<25; i++)
    {
        if (correct[i] =  = 1)
        {
            printw("%s -- Correct!\n", word_list[word_number].c_str());
        }
        else
        {
            printw("%s -- Incorrect.\n", word_list[word_number].c_str());
        }
    }
}

Here is my source code in its entirety

The errors occur on lines 72, 85, and 98

EDIT: After removing the labels, as suggested, the solution to my problem was simply to replace the comparison instances of input to a char with input[0] to a char.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Bo Persson, Greg S, Jeff Atwood May 7 '11 at 23:01

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
You are going to find that the goto start; in validate() can't go to the label start in play(). You might do better to use fewer global variables, too; it is hard work having to look back up to the top of the file to work out what everything is. Pass parameters; eschew globals. – Jonathan Leffler May 7 '11 at 14:53
    
what's with the global variables? – David Heffernan May 7 '11 at 14:54
    
input should be a char I guess but this code has so many issues! – David Heffernan May 7 '11 at 14:56
    
Thanks, I suppose. – Captain Lightning May 7 '11 at 15:19
    
Could you at least mark lines 72/85/98 with comments so we can easily find them. – Loki Astari May 7 '11 at 18:20

if (input == alphabet[i]) has a std::string on its left and a char on its right, so the comparison is obviously not defined.

You perhaps wanted to iterate through all characters in input and compare input[n] (n being the current index) if it is contained in alphabet. You can use alphabet.find to get this much quicker (or you can exploit the ASCII representation of the characters).

share|improve this answer

In each of these lines you enumerated you compare a std::string with a char.

In line 72, for example, are you checking if input has a character outside of alphabet? If so, and assuming the alphabet is sorted, try

std::set<char> ins(in.begin(), in.end());
if( *ins.begin() < *alph.begin() || *ins.rbegin() > *alph.rbegin() )
    valid = false;

where in is input and alph is alphabet.

share|improve this answer
    
As much as I appreciate your help, I try to stick to code I can understand :) – Captain Lightning May 7 '11 at 15:26
    
You need #include<set> to compile the code. What I'm doing is creating a set with the content of input. A std::set is a container that holds its data sorted and with no duplicates. Now, if both ins and alph are sorted then I can quickly tell if there's a character in ins that is not in alph by comparing the first character of ins and alph and then the last character of ins and alph. I'm taking advantage of the fact that the English lower case letters are sorted and lie consecutively in the ASCII character set. – wilhelmtell May 7 '11 at 15:38

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