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Here's my problem: I wrote two base classes: Wire and CircuitComponent. The two were almost similar enough to derive from a common superclass, but not. Wire can only join with CircuitComponent, and CircuitComponent can only join with wire. The implementations were identical aside from type though, so naturally I thought templates were the answer.

Here's the template, and I have a Wire class that derives from TwoTypeMesh<Wire, CircuitComponent> and a CircuitComponent class that derives from TwoTypeMesh<CircuitComponent, Wire> :

template <class thisType, class otherType>
class TwoTypeMesh {
    std::set<otherType *> neighbors;
public:
    void join(otherType * n){
        if (neighbors.find(n) != neighbors.end()) {
            return;
        } else {
            neighbors.insert(n);
            n->join(this);
        }
    }

    void disconnect(otherType * n){
        if (neighbors.find(n) == neighbors.end()) {
            return;
        } else {
            neighbors.erase(n);
            n->disconnect(this);
        }
    }
};

Problem is I can't get it to compile, it complains about the line with n->join(this) cause this is of type TwoTypeMesh<Wire, CircuitComponent> (the superclass of Wire) but join is only defined for a wire.

My best theory thus far is that I shouldn't be subclassing, maybe typedef, but I haven't managed to make it work yet.

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maybe typedef TwoTypeMesh<otherType, thisType> realOtherType; ? –  Kris R. May 7 '11 at 16:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The minimally-invasive way to make your code compile is indeed to use a typedef, and either tag classes, or simply Enumerations:

enum MeshType { MeshTypeWire, MeshTypeCircuitComponent };

template <MeshType thisType>
class TwoTypeMesh {
    // calculate 'otherType' from 'thisType' (prevents usage mistakes):
    static const MeshType otherType =
        thisType == MeshTypeWire ? MeshTypeCircuitComponent :
        /* else */                 MeshTypeWire ;
    std::set< TypeTwoMesh<otherType> *> neighbors;
public:
    void join(TypeTwoMesh<otherType> * n){
        if (neighbors.find(n) != neighbors.end()) {
            return;
        } else {
            neighbors.insert(n);
            n->join(this);
        }
    }

    void disconnect(TypeTwoMesh<otherType> * n){
        if (neighbors.find(n) == neighbors.end()) {
            return;
        } else {
            neighbors.erase(n);
            n->disconnect(this);
        }
    }
};

typedef TwoTypeMesh<MeshTypeWire> Wire;
typedef TwoTypeMesh<CircuitComponent> CircuitComponent;
share|improve this answer
    
Is it legal to use an enumerated value as a type? It looks logically to make sense, but I don't understand how TypeTwoMesh<MeshTypeWire> (which is enumerated, making it an int) really works... –  Alex Gosselin May 7 '11 at 16:55
1  
@Alex: template arguments in C++ can be types, but also integral constants, which enum values are. –  Marc Mutz - mmutz May 7 '11 at 17:32

move the join() outside the class:

void join(Wire &w, CircuitComponent &j);
void join(CircuitComponent &j, Wire &w);

you might need to make the functions friend of the class to access private data members.

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That would just mean not using templates at all essentially, and I still need to have two almost identical function definitions for that. –  Alex Gosselin May 7 '11 at 17:03
    
I think you're trying too hard to avoid duplicating the code, even in situations where it would not work very well. Keep the interface to your class ok, and then duplicate whatever is required by the correct function prototypes. –  tp1 May 7 '11 at 17:37
    
I agree with tp1 - interface is the dog, implementation is the tail. You might be willing to weaken your interface because it's really difficult to implement the ideal interface, but a bit of code duplication, that you may later figure out how to avoid, isn't serious difficulty. At first glance, could you avoid duplication just by having void join(CircuitComponent &j, Wire &w) { join(w,j); }? Then do the work to check and add both to the other as neighbours, in the first join. –  Steve Jessop May 7 '11 at 21:34

To address your specific compilation error, you should be able to static_cast this to thisType* in the call to n->join.

You appear to have accidentally re-invented CRTP: a template base class which takes the derived class as a template parameter. Just don't ever inherit from TwoTypeMesh<T,U> in any class other than T, and make TwoTypeMesh's constructors protected to prevent direct instantiation. Then you can be sure any instance of TwoTypeMesh<T, something> is a base class subobject of an instance of T (or a derived class of T), and hence the static_cast to T* is valid.

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Can TwoTypeMesh constructors be private and then use friend class T;? Then you guarantee that any subclass must provide its own type as the first template parameter. –  Ben Voigt May 9 '11 at 2:35
    
@Ben: I should think so, that's also part of a trick you can use to make a class un-inheritable-from. –  Steve Jessop May 9 '11 at 8:32

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