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How to find (and replace) all old C-style data type casts in my C++ source code?

I'm currently refactoring some old code and the project I am working on has a policy of only using the new c++ style casts. I'm trying to make sure that I don't miss any but currently the approach I'm taking is quite crude so I'm wondering if there is any way of making the old c style casts not compile in a c++ project? (or at least give a compiler warning if this is not possible)

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marked as duplicate by Marc Mutz - mmutz, Bo Persson, ybungalobill, dmckee, Graviton May 9 '11 at 13:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
See [stackoverflow.com/questions/1272570/… for a solution with GCC. –  hammar May 7 '11 at 18:07
    
@hammar, is there a way to do this with other non-gcc compilers? –  shuttle87 May 7 '11 at 18:11
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@shuttle87: Things like these are very compiler-specific. Which compiler are you using? –  hammar May 7 '11 at 18:12
    
@hammar, tried the option in the link you posted with gcc4.6 and got the following problem cc1plus: error: unrecognized command line option ‘-Wold-style-casts’ –  shuttle87 May 8 '11 at 16:50
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@shuttle87: It should be -Wold-style-cast. Note no s at the end. –  hammar May 8 '11 at 16:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

If you use GCC, add -Wold-style-cast to the command line. That gives warnings, not errors, but you can always add -Werror, which turns warnings (all warnings) into errors.

As for other compilers, it seems no other compiler has such a warning option.

But that doesn't really matter: GCC is Free Software, and available on practically anything that can distinguish between zeros and ones. Just install it alongside your main compiler on your workstation, or into your continuous integration system, and use it for this task only. You will find that having two C++ compilers at hand is very convenient in general.

If installing GCC really isn't an option for you, you might want to take a peek at How to find (and replace) all old C-style data type casts in my C++ source code?, where some alternatives are discussed.

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Amazing, thankyou! But what about other compilers? –  shuttle87 May 7 '11 at 18:10
    
@huttle87: see the thread hammar linked which seems to have established that GCC is the only compiler with such an option. Which isn't much of a problem, because gcc is available nearly everywhere, you just need to install it alongside your main compiler (which is something you should do anyway, testing with two compilers, I mean :) –  Marc Mutz - mmutz May 7 '11 at 18:38
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@mmutz: funny, I see that clang has implemented the parsing of this flag, however it's a stub and not mapped to anything susbtantial :) –  Matthieu M. May 7 '11 at 19:58
    
"Just install it alongside your main compiler on your workstation, or into your continuous integration system, and use it for this task only" - certainly worth a try, but not a complete solution. It only helps if the code is sufficiently portable to compile on GCC. Making the code compile on mingw32 isn't a bad exercise, but even then it won't find C-style casts in code inside #ifdef MSC_VER or whatever. –  Steve Jessop May 7 '11 at 21:10
    
@Matthieu: doesn't Clang make some effort to be option-compatible with GCC, to make it easier to switch between them? Could be they haven't got round to implementing it, or could just be a bodge so that makefiles etc work. –  Steve Jessop May 7 '11 at 21:12

I recommend using this Perl script. Except for unusual conditions like (void**)&b.ComInterfaceCall it just appears to work.

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