Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I wrote the following script to change the color of the shell depending on which host I'm trying to connect to. And, although it works, I'm wondering if there's a better way to do things? Specifically, is there a more cross-shell way of changing the prompt color? Also, is there a better approach to applying a regex to the host name (outside of grep/ack)?

Either case, here's the code:

function ssh() {

    #save all args (makes it easier to pass to ssh later)
    local all_args=$*

    #save path to ssh exec in current $PATH
    local ssh_path=$(which ssh)

    # host is second to last arg. see ssh -h
    local host=${@:(-2):1}


    #### color codes for tput ####
    # setaf=foreground, setab=background
    # 0 Black
    # 1 Red
    # 2 Green
    # 3 Yellow
    # 4 Blue
    # 5 Magenta
    # 6 Cyan
    # 7 White
    # sgr0 reset
    ##############################

    #### Or if you're on a Mac ####
    # you can use an AppleScript to
    # change to a different Terminal
    # setting. I use Pro (white/black)
    # by default, but jump to a custom
    # one called 'mpowell-md' which
    # is a shade of red when connecting
    # to mpowell-md
    ###############################

    case $host in

            # can use basic regex here
            *mpowell\-md*)
                    # osascript -e "tell application \"Terminal\" to set current settings of first window to settings set named \"mpowell-md\""
                    tput setaf 1;#red
            ;;

            # default case
            *)
                    # could default to setting it back to Pro, etc...
                    # osascript -e "tell application \"Terminal\" to set current settings of first window to settings set named \"Pro\""
            ;;
    esac

    #run and wait for ssh to finish
    eval "$ssh_path $all_args"


    tput sgr0;#reset
    #osascript -e "tell application \"Terminal\" to set current settings of first window to settings set named \"Pro\""
}

Let me know what you think, and thanks!

- Matt

share|improve this question
    
I've read something about using PS1 to change the color as well, but, admittedly don't fully understand exactly what it's changing, how it relates to tput, and how cross-shell it is. cyberciti.biz/faq/… –  Matt P May 7 '11 at 18:45
    
You can indeed use color escape codes in PS1 to change the color of the prompt itself, but changing the color of the whole terminal is a bit different. –  John Zwinck May 7 '11 at 19:04
    
I'm only looking for the color of something to change; whether that's the background, prompt, title bar, etc makes no difference. However, I'd like to have only 1 call and have that call work on as many shell's as possible. Would you recommend the PS1 route? –  Matt P May 7 '11 at 21:10
    
I would most certainly recommend the PS1 route. I use it myself, though not for exactly this purpose, and it has served me well for many years on Solaris, AIX, and a few Linux distros. –  John Zwinck May 8 '11 at 17:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

PS1 works quite well as a relatively non invasive but prominent place to give a visual indicator on where you are. It also leaves the rest of the shell untouched which is important if you have colours active in the shell in other ways (like showing files of different types in different colours).

For example we apply this style to boxes & use different colours for prod, uat, stg, dev etc

e.g.

PS1="[\!]:[\w]\n[\u@\h] \[\033[1m\]\[\033[41m\] $SOME_VARIABLE \[\033[0m\] $ "

so this gives a 2 line prompt like

[501]:[/home/matt]
[matt@mybox] FOO $ 

where FOO has a solid red background (in this example).

PS1 is a sh (and variants) feature btw.

share|improve this answer
2  
And you can include SendEnv PS1=.... right in your ~/.ssh/config –  sehe May 7 '11 at 23:16
    
Thanks all, very helpful! –  Matt P May 8 '11 at 18:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.