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Update:
Again thanks for the examples, they have been very helpful and with the following I don't mean to take anything away from them.

Aren't the currently given examples, as far as I understand them & state-machines, only half of what we usually understand by a state-machine?
In the sense that the examples do change state but that's only represented by changing the value of a variable (and allowing different value- changes in different states), while usually a statemachine should also change it's behavior, and behavior not (only) in the sense of allowing different value changes for a variable depending on state, but in the sense of allowing different methods to be executed for different states.

Or do I have a misconception of state machines and their commen use?

Best regards


Original question:
I found discussion about state machines & iterator blocks in c# and tools to create state machines and what not for C#, so I found a lot of abstract stuff but as a noob all of this is a little confusing.

So it would be great if someone could provide a C# source code-example that realizes a simple state machine with perhaps 3,4 states, just to get the gist of it.


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Are you wondering about state machines in general or just iterator based ones? –  Skurmedel May 7 '11 at 21:15
    
I was wondering about state machines in general –  Jennifer Owens May 8 '11 at 12:10
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12 Answers

Let's start with this simple state diagram:

We have:

  • 4 states (Inactive, Active, Paused, and Exited)
  • 5 types of state transitions (Begin Command, End Command, Pause Command, Resume Command, Exit Command).

You can convert this to C# in a handful of ways, such as performing a switch statement on the current state and command, or looking up transitions in a transition table. For this simple state machine, I prefer a transition table, which is very easy to represent using a Dictionary:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace Juliet
{
    public enum ProcessState
    {
        Inactive,
        Active,
        Paused,
        Terminated
    }

    public enum Command
    {
        Begin,
        End,
        Pause,
        Resume,
        Exit
    }

    public class Process
    {
        class StateTransition
        {
            readonly ProcessState CurrentState;
            readonly Command Command;

            public StateTransition(ProcessState currentState, Command command)
            {
                CurrentState = currentState;
                Command = command;
            }

            public override int GetHashCode()
            {
                return 17 + 31 * CurrentState.GetHashCode() + 31 * Command.GetHashCode();
            }

            public override bool Equals(object obj)
            {
                StateTransition other = obj as StateTransition;
                return other != null && this.CurrentState == other.CurrentState && this.Command == other.Command;
            }
        }

        Dictionary<StateTransition, ProcessState> transitions;
        public ProcessState CurrentState { get; private set; }

        public Process()
        {
            CurrentState = ProcessState.Inactive;
            transitions = new Dictionary<StateTransition, ProcessState>
            {
                { new StateTransition(ProcessState.Inactive, Command.Exit), ProcessState.Terminated },
                { new StateTransition(ProcessState.Inactive, Command.Begin), ProcessState.Active },
                { new StateTransition(ProcessState.Active, Command.End), ProcessState.Inactive },
                { new StateTransition(ProcessState.Active, Command.Pause), ProcessState.Paused },
                { new StateTransition(ProcessState.Paused, Command.End), ProcessState.Inactive },
                { new StateTransition(ProcessState.Paused, Command.Resume), ProcessState.Active }
            };
        }

        public ProcessState GetNext(Command command)
        {
            StateTransition transition = new StateTransition(CurrentState, command);
            ProcessState nextState;
            if (!transitions.TryGetValue(transition, out nextState))
                throw new Exception("Invalid transition: " + CurrentState + " -> " + command);
            return nextState;
        }

        public ProcessState MoveNext(Command command)
        {
            CurrentState = GetNext(command);
            return CurrentState;
        }
    }


    public class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Process p = new Process();
            Console.WriteLine("Current State = " + p.CurrentState);
            Console.WriteLine("Command.Begin: Current State = " + p.MoveNext(Command.Begin));
            Console.WriteLine("Command.Pause: Current State = " + p.MoveNext(Command.Pause));
            Console.WriteLine("Command.End: Current State = " + p.MoveNext(Command.End));
            Console.WriteLine("Command.Exit: Current State = " + p.MoveNext(Command.Exit));
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

As a matter of personal preference, I like to design my state machines with a GetNext function to return the next state deterministically, and a MoveNext function to mutate the state machine.

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15  
+1 for the diagram –  Pete Stensønes May 7 '11 at 22:04
14  
+1 for the correct implementation of GetHashCode() using primes. –  ja72 May 8 '11 at 0:05
1  
Could you please explain me the purpose of GetHashCode()? –  Siddharth Sep 5 '12 at 13:46
5  
@Siddharth: The StateTransition class is used as key in the dictionary and equality of keys are important. Two distinct instances of StateTransition should be considered equal as long as they represent the same transition (e.g. CurrentState and Command are the same). To implement equality you have to override Equals as well as GetHashCode. In particular the dictionary will use the hash code and two equal objects must return the same hash code. You also get good performance if not too many non-equal objects share the same hash code which is why GetHashCode is implemented as shown. –  Martin Liversage Nov 9 '12 at 10:25
1  
Elegant and simple. Thanks, you are a life saver. –  Chorinator Mar 16 '13 at 5:31
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You might want to use one of the existing open source Finite State Machines. E.g. bbv.Common.StateMachine found at http://code.google.com/p/bbvcommon/wiki/StateMachine. It has a very intuitive fluent syntax and a lot of features such as, enter/exit actions, transition actions, guards, hierarchical, passive implementation (executed on the thread of the caller) and active implementation (own thread on which the fsm runs, events are added to a queue).

Taking Juliets example the definition for the state machine gets very easy:

var fsm = new PassiveStateMachine<ProcessState, Command>();
fsm.In(ProcessState.Inactive)
   .On(Command.Exit).Goto(ProcessState.Terminated).Execute(SomeTransitionAction)
   .On(Command.Begin).Goto(ProcessState.Active);
fsm.In(ProcessState.Active)
   .ExecuteOnEntry(SomeEntryAction)
   .ExecuteOnExit(SomeExitAction)
   .On(Command.End).Goto(ProcessState.Inactive)
   .On(Command.Pause).Goto(ProcessState.Paused);
fsm.In(ProcessState.Paused)
   .On(Command.End).Goto(ProcessState.Inactive).OnlyIf(SomeGuard)
   .On(Command.Resume).Goto(ProcessState.Active);
fsm.Initialize(ProcessState.Inactive);
fsm.Start();

fsm.Fire(Command.Begin);
share|improve this answer
3  
Thank you for referencing this excellent open source state machine. Can I ask how can I get current state ? –  Ramazan POLAT Nov 10 '12 at 2:48
2  
You can't and you shouldn't. State is something unstable. When you request the state it is possible that you are in the middle of a transition. All actions should be done within transitions, state entry and state exits. If you really want to have the state then you can add a local field and assign the state in a entry action. –  Remo Gloor Nov 11 '12 at 4:53
    
I have a order processing software to build. So I need to know in which state is the order. For example the states are 'ordered','being prepared','sent','delivered' and so on. So I need to know the current state. Can you post and example for that. I really need it. –  Ramazan POLAT Nov 11 '12 at 20:32
2  
The question is for what do you "need" it and if you really need the SM state or some other kind of state. E.g. if you need some display text then several stated could have the same display text for example if preparing for send has multiple sub states. In this case you should do exactly what you intend to do. Update some display text at the correct places. E.g. within ExecuteOnEntry. If you need more info then ask a new Question and state exactly your problem as this is getting off topic here. –  Remo Gloor Nov 12 '12 at 12:30
    
Ok I am asking a new question and waiting you to reply. Because I don't think somebody else solve this problem since you have the best answer but still questioner didn't accept. I will post question url here. Thanks. –  Ramazan POLAT Nov 12 '12 at 20:01
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Heres an example of a very clasic finite state machine, modelling a very simplified electronic device (like a TV)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace fsm
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var fsm = new FiniteStateMachine();
        Console.WriteLine(fsm.State);
        fsm.ProcessEvent(FiniteStateMachine.Events.PlugIn);
        Console.WriteLine(fsm.State);
        fsm.ProcessEvent(FiniteStateMachine.Events.TurnOn);
        Console.WriteLine(fsm.State);
        fsm.ProcessEvent(FiniteStateMachine.Events.TurnOff);
        Console.WriteLine(fsm.State);
        fsm.ProcessEvent(FiniteStateMachine.Events.TurnOn);
        Console.WriteLine(fsm.State);
        fsm.ProcessEvent(FiniteStateMachine.Events.RemovePower);
        Console.WriteLine(fsm.State);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    class FiniteStateMachine
    {
        public enum States { Start, Standby, On };
        public States State { get; set; }

        public enum Events { PlugIn, TurnOn, TurnOff, RemovePower };

        private Action[,] fsm;

        public FiniteStateMachine()
        {
            this.fsm = new Action[3, 4] { 
                //PlugIn,       TurnOn,                 TurnOff,            RemovePower
                {this.PowerOn,  null,                   null,               null},              //start
                {null,          this.StandbyWhenOff,    null,               this.PowerOff},     //standby
                {null,          null,                   this.StandbyWhenOn, this.PowerOff} };   //on
        }
        public void ProcessEvent(Events theEvent)
        {
            this.fsm[(int)this.State, (int)theEvent].Invoke();
        }

        private void PowerOn() { this.State = States.Standby; }
        private void PowerOff() { this.State = States.Start; }
        private void StandbyWhenOn() { this.State = States.Standby; }
        private void StandbyWhenOff() { this.State = States.On; }
    }
}
}
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2  
for anyone new to state machines, this is an excellent first example to get ones feet wet first. –  CoffeeAddict Jan 9 '13 at 4:50
1  
I am new to state machines and seriously, this has brought me The Light - thanks! –  MC5 Dec 2 '13 at 17:35
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Some shameless self-promo here, but a while ago I created a library called YieldMachine which allows a limited-complexity state machine to be described in a very clean and simple way. For example, consider a lamp:

state machine of a lamp

Notice that this state machine has 2 triggers and 3 states. In YieldMachine code, we write a single method for all state-related behavior, in which we commit the horrible atrocity of using goto for each state. A trigger becomes a property or field of type Action, decorated with an attribute called Trigger. I've commented the code of the first state and its transitions below; the next states follow the same pattern.

public class Lamp : StateMachine
{
    // Triggers (or events, or actions, whatever) that our
    // state machine understands.
    [Trigger]
    public readonly Action PressSwitch;

    [Trigger]
    public readonly Action GotError;

    // Actual state machine logic
    protected override IEnumerable WalkStates()
    {
    off:                                       
        Console.WriteLine("off.");
        yield return null;

        if (Trigger == PressSwitch) goto on;
        InvalidTrigger();

    on:
        Console.WriteLine("*shiiine!*");
        yield return null;

        if (Trigger == GotError) goto error;
        if (Trigger == PressSwitch) goto off;
        InvalidTrigger();

    error:
        Console.WriteLine("-err-");
        yield return null;

        if (Trigger == PressSwitch) goto off;
        InvalidTrigger();
    }
}

Short and nice, eh!

This state machine is controlled simply by sending triggers to it:

var sm = new Lamp();
sm.PressSwitch(); //go on
sm.PressSwitch(); //go off

sm.PressSwitch(); //go on
sm.GotError();    //get error
sm.PressSwitch(); //go off

Just to clarify, I've added some comments to the first state to help you understand how to use this.

    protected override IEnumerable WalkStates()
    {
    off:                                       // Each goto label is a state

        Console.WriteLine("off.");             // State entry actions

        yield return null;                     // This means "Wait until a 
                                               // trigger is called"

                                               // Ah, we got triggered! 
                                               //   perform state exit actions 
                                               //   (none, in this case)

        if (Trigger == PressSwitch) goto on;   // Transitions go here: 
                                               // depending on the trigger 
                                               // that was called, go to
                                               // the right state

        InvalidTrigger();                      // Throw exception on 
                                               // invalid trigger

        ...

This works because the C# compiler actually created a state machine internally for each method that uses yield return. This construct is usually used to lazily create sequences of data, but in this case we're not actually interested in the returned sequence (which is all nulls anyway), but in the state behaviour that gets created under the hood.

The StateMachine base class does some reflection on construction to assign code to each [Trigger] action, which sets the Trigger member and moves the state machine forward.

But you don't really need to understand the internals to be able to use it.

share|improve this answer
    
The "goto" is only atrocious if it jumps between methods. That, fortunately, is not allowed in C#. –  Brannon May 1 '13 at 17:55
    
Good point! In fact, I would be very impressed if any statically typed language would manage to allow a goto between methods. –  skrebbel May 3 '13 at 11:01
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You can code an iterator block that lets you execute a code block in an orchestrated fashion. How the code block is broken up really doesn't have to correspond to anything, it's just how you want to code it. For example:

IEnumerable<int> CountToTen()
{
    System.Console.WriteLine("1");
    yield return 0;
    System.Console.WriteLine("2");
    System.Console.WriteLine("3");
    System.Console.WriteLine("4");
    yield return 0;
    System.Console.WriteLine("5");
    System.Console.WriteLine("6");
    System.Console.WriteLine("7");
    yield return 0;
    System.Console.WriteLine("8");
    yield return 0;
    System.Console.WriteLine("9");
    System.Console.WriteLine("10");
}

In this case, when you call CountToTen, nothing actually executes, yet. What you get is effectively a state machine generator, for which you can create a new instance of the state machine. You do this by calling GetEnumerator(). The resulting IEnumerator is effectively a state machine that you can drive by calling MoveNext(...).

Thus, in this example, the first time you call MoveNext(...) you will see "1" written to the console, and the next time you call MoveNext(...) you will see 2, 3, 4, and then 5, 6, 7 and then 8, and then 9, 10. As you can see, it's a useful mechanism for orchestrating how things should occur.

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4  
Obligatory link to fair warning –  sehe May 7 '11 at 20:52
    
Definitely a good link, thanks! –  Kevin Hsu May 7 '11 at 21:02
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It's useful to remember that state machines are an abstraction, and you don't need particular tools to create one, however tools can be useful.

You can for example realise a state machine with functions:

void Hunt(IList<Gull> gulls)
{
    if (gulls.Empty())
       return;

    var target = gulls.First();
    TargetAcquired(target, gulls);
}

void TargetAcquired(Gull target, IList<Gull> gulls)
{
    var balloon = new WaterBalloon(weightKg: 20);

    this.Cannon.Fire(balloon);

    if (balloon.Hit)
    {
       TargetHit(target, gulls);
    }
    else
       TargetMissed(target, gulls);
}

void TargetHit(Gull target, IList<Gull> gulls)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Suck on it {0}!", target.Name);
    Hunt(gulls);
}

void TargetMissed(Gull target, IList<Gull> gulls)
{
    Console.WriteLine("I'll get ya!");
    TargetAcquired(target, gulls);
}

This machine would hunt for gulls and try to hit them with water balloons. If it misses it will try firing one until it hits (could do with some realistic expectations ;)), otherwise it will gloat in the console. It continues to hunt until it's out of gulls to harass.

Each function corresponds to each state; the start and end (or accept) states are not shown. There are probably more states in there than modelled by the functions though. For example after firing the balloon the machine is really in another state than it was before it, but I decided this distinction was impractical to make.

A common way is to use classes to represent states, and then connect them in different ways.

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Im posting annother answer here as this is state machines from a different perspective; very visual.

My origianl answer is clasic imperitive code. I think its quite visual as code goes becuase of the array which makes visualising the state machine simple. The downside is you have to write all this. Remos's answer aleviates the effort of writing the boiler-plate code but is far less visual. There is the third alternative; really drawing the state machine.

If you are using .NET and can target version 4 of the run time then you have the option of using workflow's state machine activities. These in essence let you draw the state machine (much as in Juliet's diagram) and have the WF runtime execute it for you.

See the MSDN article Building State Machines with Windows Workflow Foundation for more details, and this CodePlex site for the latest version.

Thats the option I would always prefer when targeting .NET because its easy to see, change and explain to non programmers; pictures are worth a thousand words as they say!

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What a bout StatePattern. Does that fit your needs?

I think its context related, but its worth a shot for sure.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_pattern

This let your states decide where to go and not the "object" class.

Bruno

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The state pattern deals with a class that can act differently based on the state/mode it is in, it does not deal with transition between states. –  Eli Algranti Dec 12 '13 at 23:31
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I've just contributed this:

https://code.google.com/p/ysharp/source/browse/#svn%2Ftrunk%2FStateMachinesPoC

Here's one of the examples demoing direct sending of commands, iteration over IEnumerable(of signal)'s, and states as IObserver(of signal), thus responders to a signal source:

public enum TVEvent { Plug, SwitchOn, SwitchOff, Unplug, Destroy }

    // The TV state value type:
    public enum TVStatus
    {
            Undefined,
            Unplugged,
            Off,
            On,
            Disposed
    }

    // The TV state metadata attribute to annotate the TV state with the definitions of allowed transitions:
    public class TVTransitionAttribute : TransitionAttribute
    {
            public TVStatus From { get; set; }
            public TVEvent When { get; set; }
            public TVStatus Goto { get; set; }
            public string With { get; set; }
    }

    // The TV state proper:
    [TVTransition(From = TVStatus.Unplugged,        When = TVEvent.Destroy,         Goto = TVStatus.Disposed,       With = "TVStateChange")]
    [TVTransition(From = TVStatus.Off,                      When = TVEvent.Destroy,         Goto = TVStatus.Disposed,       With = "TVStateChange")]
    [TVTransition(From = TVStatus.On,                       When = TVEvent.Destroy,         Goto = TVStatus.Disposed,       With = "TVStateChange")]
    [TVTransition(From = TVStatus.Unplugged,        When = TVEvent.Plug,            Goto = TVStatus.Off,            With = "TVStateChange")]
    [TVTransition(From = TVStatus.Off,                      When = TVEvent.SwitchOn,        Goto = TVStatus.On,                     With = "TVStateChange")]
    [TVTransition(From = TVStatus.Off,                      When = TVEvent.Unplug,          Goto = TVStatus.Unplugged,      With = "TVStateChange")]
    [TVTransition(From = TVStatus.On,                       When = TVEvent.SwitchOff,       Goto = TVStatus.Off,            With = "TVStateChange")]
    [TVTransition(From = TVStatus.On,                       When = TVEvent.Unplug,          Goto = TVStatus.Unplugged,      With = "TVStateChange")]
    public class TVState : State<TVStatus, TVEvent, int>
    {
            // The call to (protected) Build() is necessary to build the internal state/transition graph:
            public TVState() : base() { Build(); }

            // This method is called during each allowed transition (BEFORE the state change),
            // and whether or not the from/to states are distinct (sometimes a transition just loops over the same state):
            public static void TVStateChange(IState<TVStatus> state, TVStatus from, TVEvent trigger, TVStatus to, int args)
            {
                    Console.WriteLine("\t\t\tFrom: {0} --- (trigger: {1}({2})) --> To: {3}", from, trigger, args, to);
            }
    }

    // The TV state machine proper:
    public class Television : Machine<TVState, TVStatus, TVEvent, int> { }

    // The TV remote control:
    public class TVRemote : SignalSource<TVEvent, int> { }

    public static class Example
    {
            private static TVEvent[] SampleSimulation1
            {
                    get { return new[] { TVEvent.Plug, TVEvent.Destroy }; }
            }

            private static IEnumerable<TVEvent> SampleSimulation2
            {
                    get
                    {
                            yield return TVEvent.Plug;
                            yield return TVEvent.SwitchOn;
                            yield return TVEvent.Destroy;
                    }
            }

            public static void Run()
            {
                    // The TV's remote control is an ISignalling<Tuple<TVEvent, int>>,
                    // and also an IObservable<Tuple<TVEvent, int>> (see Simulation 4 below):
                    ISignalling<TVEvent, int> remote = new TVRemote();

                    // The TV is in fact an IMachine<TVState, TVStatus, TVEvent, int>,
                    // here shortened to its base type IMachine<TVStatus> for simple enumeration purpose:
                    IMachine<TVStatus> television = new Television();

                    // The state of the TV is in fact an IState<TVStatus, TVEvent, int>,
                    // here shortened to its base type IState<TVStatus> for simple enumeration purpose:
                    IState<TVStatus> state = new TVState();

                    // Enumerating over the IEnumerable<TVEvent> (SampleSimulation1),
                    // which is the source of triggers for state transitions:
                    Console.WriteLine("Simulation 1:");
                    foreach (TVStatus value in state.Using(SampleSimulation1).Start(TVStatus.Unplugged))
                            ;// not interested in doing anything special after each successful transition...

                    // Enumerating over the IEnumerable<TVEvent> (SampleSimulation2),
                    // which is the source of triggers for state transitions:
                    Console.WriteLine("Simulation 2:");
                    foreach (TVStatus value in state.Using(SampleSimulation2).Start(TVStatus.Unplugged))
                            // Just echo the state that we transitioned TO on the console:
                            Console.WriteLine("\t{0}", value);

                    // Anti-pattern:
                    // this coding style does work but isn't recommended:
                    Console.WriteLine("Simulation 3:");
                    if (!state.Start(TVStatus.Unplugged).IsFinal)
                    {
                            Console.WriteLine("\t... Done? {0}", state.IsFinal);
                            if (state.Consume(TVEvent.Plug) && !state.IsFinal)
                            {
                                    Console.WriteLine("\t... Done? {0}", state.IsFinal);
                                    if (state.Consume(TVEvent.SwitchOn) && !state.IsFinal)
                                    {
                                            Console.WriteLine("\t... Done? {0}", state.IsFinal);
                                            if (state.Consume(TVEvent.SwitchOff) && !state.IsFinal)
                                            {
                                                    Console.WriteLine("\t... Done? {0}", state.IsFinal);
                                                    if (state.Consume(TVEvent.Destroy) && !state.IsFinal)
                                                            Console.WriteLine("(not executed)");
                                                    else
                                                            Console.WriteLine("\t... Done? {0}", state.IsFinal);
                                            }
                                    }
                            }
                    }

                    Console.WriteLine("Simulation 4:");
                    // Ensure we are back in the start state:
                    state = television.Using(remote).Start(TVStatus.Unplugged);
                    // Now use the various remote control's Emit signatures:
                    remote.Emit(TVEvent.Plug);
                    remote.Emit(TVEvent.SwitchOn, 1);
                    remote.Emit(new Tuple<TVEvent, int>(TVEvent.SwitchOff, 2));
                    remote.Emit(new KeyValuePair<TVEvent, int>(TVEvent.Unplug, 3));
                    remote.Emit(TVEvent.Destroy, 4);
            }
    }

}

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Today i deep in State Design Pattern. I did and tested ThreadState, which equal (+/-) to Threading in C#, as described in picture from enter link description here

enter image description here

You can easly add new states, configure moves from one state to other is very easy becouse it incapsulated in state implementation

Implementation and using at: Implements .NET ThreadState by State Design Pattern

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I think the state machine proposed by Juliet has a mistake: the method GetHashCode can return the same hash code for two different transitions, for example:

State = Active (1) , Command = Pause (2) => HashCode = 17 + 31 + 62 = 110

State = Paused (2) , Command = End (1) => HashCode = 17 + 62 + 31 = 110

To avoid this error, the method should be like this:

public override int GetHashCode()
   {
            return 17 + 23 * CurrentState.GetHashCode() + 31 * Command.GetHashCode();
   }

Alex

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I haven't tried implementing a FSM in C# yet, but these all sound (or look) very complicated to the way I handled FSM's in the past in low-level languages like C or ASM.

I believe the method I've always known is called something like an "Iterative Loop". In it, you essentially have a 'while' loop that periodically exits based on events (interrupts), then returns to the main loop again.

Within the interrupt handlers, you would pass a CurrentState and return a NextState, which then overwrites the CurrentState variable in the main loop. You do this ad infinitum until the program closes (or the microcontroller resets).

What I'm seeing other answers all look very complicated compared with how a FSM is, in my mind, intended to be implemented; its beauty lies in its simplicity and FSM can be very complicated with many, many states and transitions, but they allow complicated process to be easily broken down and digested.

I realize my response shouldn't include another question, but I am forced to ask: why do these other proposed solutions appear to be so complicated?
They seem to be akin to hitting a small nail with a giant sledge hammer.

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