Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my routes.rb file I want to use the subdomain constraints feature in rails3 however I would like to exclude certain domains from the catch all route. I dont want to have certain controller in a specific subdomain. What would be the best practice in doing so.

# this subdomain i dont want all of the catch all routes
constraints :subdomain => "signup" do
  resources :users
end

# here I want to catch all but exclude the "signup" subdomain
constraints :subdomain => /.+/ do
  resources :cars
  resources :stations
end
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You can use negative lookahead in your constraint regex to exclude some domains.

constrain :subdomain => /^(?!login|signup)(\w+)/ do
  resources :whatever
end

Try this out on Rubular

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you for helping me with this technique. I modified it myself to further limit the regex to not match patterns with the first bit and additional characters afterwards. –  George Drummond May 8 '11 at 11:13
1  
@edgerunner Thanks for the Rubular link too! –  scarver2 Jul 18 '13 at 19:14

this is the solution I came to.

constrain :subdomain => /^(?!signup\b|api\b)(\w+)/ do
  resources :whatever
end

it will match api but not apis

share|improve this answer
    
It does exclude api and not apis but keep in mind it also would exclude api-foo. Using \Z(end of string) instead of \b (word boundary, as George clearly knows) will no longer exclude api-foo. (Of course, it all depends on why you might want to exclude these strings, but more options are better, I figure!) –  Alan H. Jul 15 '11 at 20:40

Using a negative lookahead as suggested by edgerunner & George is great.

Basically the pattern is going to be:

constrain :subdomain => /^(?!signup\Z|api\Z)(\w+)/ do
  resources :whatever
end

This is the same as George's suggestion but I changed the \b to \Z — changing from a word boundary to the end of the input string itself (as noted in my comment on George's answer).

Here are a bunch of test cases showing the difference:

irb(main):001:0> re = /^(?!www\b)(\w+)/
=> /^(?!www\b)(\w+)/
irb(main):003:0> re =~ "www"
=> nil
irb(main):004:0> re =~ "wwwi"
=> 0
irb(main):005:0> re =~ "iwwwi"
=> 0
irb(main):006:0> re =~ "ww-i"
=> 0
irb(main):007:0> re =~ "www-x"
=> nil
irb(main):009:0> re2 = /^(?!www\Z)(\w+)/
=> /^(?!www\Z)(\w+)/
irb(main):010:0> re2 =~ "www"
=> nil
irb(main):011:0> re2 =~ "wwwi"
=> 0
irb(main):012:0> re2 =~ "ww"
=> 0
irb(main):013:0> re2 =~ "www-x"
=> 0
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.