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I have a Posrgres 9.04 database table with over 12,000,000 rows.

I need a program to read each row, do some calculations and lookups (against a 2nd table), then write a new row in a 3rd table with the results of these calculations. When done, the 3rd table will have the same number of rows as the 1st table.

Executing serially on a Core i7 720QM processor takes more than 24 hours. It only taxes one of my 8 cores (4 physical cores, but 8 visible to Windows 7 via HTT).

I want to speed this up with parallelism. I thought I could use PLINQ and Npgsql:

NpgsqlDataReader records = new NpgsqlCommand("SELECT * FROM table", conn).ExecuteReader();
var single_record = from row in records.AsParallel()
             select row;

However, I get an error for records.AsParallel(): Could not find an implementation of the query pattern for source type 'System.Linq.ParallelQuery'. 'Select' not found. Consider explicitly specifying the type of the range variable 'row'.

I've done a lot of Google searches, and I'm just coming up more confused. NpgsqlDataReader inherits from System.Data.Common.DbDataReader, which in turn implements IEnumerable, which has the AsParallel extension, so seems like the right stuff is in place to get this working?

It's not clear to me what I could even do to explicitly specify the type of the range variable. It appears that best practice is not to specify this.

I am open to switching to a DataSet, presuming that's PLINQ compatible, but would rather avoid if possible because of the 12,000,000 rows.

Is this even something achievable with Npgsql? Do I need to use Devart's dotConnect for PostgreSQL instead?

UPDATE: Just found http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/parallelextensions/thread/2f5ce226-c500-4899-a923-99285ace42ae, which led me to try this:

foreach(IDataRecord arrest in
            from row in arrests.AsParallel().Cast <IDataRecord>()
            select row)

So far no errors in the IDE, but is this a proper way of constructing this?

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I may be talking nonsense, but did you try using the .net 4.0 version of Npgsql. It is compiled against EF which can give you Linq support. I hope it helps. –  Francisco Junior May 7 '11 at 22:55
    
@FranciscoJunior - Thanks. Yes, I am using the DLLs in Npgsql2.0.11.91-bin-ms.net4.0.zip. In Visual Studio 2010, the DLL's Runtime Version field is v4.0.30319. –  Aren Cambre May 8 '11 at 2:41
    
Hmmmmm, then maybe in order for the AsParallel to work, there may need some support inside Npgsql. I'll check out how this can be done and will let you know. Just saw your edit. How did it go up until now. Are you getting performance benefits from it? –  Francisco Junior May 8 '11 at 16:48
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is indeed the solution:

foreach(IDataRecord arrest in
        from row in arrests.AsParallel().Cast <IDataRecord>()
        select row)

This solution was inspired by what I found at http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/parallelextensions/thread/2f5ce226-c500-4899-a923-99285ace42ae#1956768e-9403-4671-a196-8dfb3d7070e3. It's not clear to me why the cast and type specification is needed, but it works.

EDIT: While this doesn't cause syntax or runtime errors, it in fact does not make things run in parallel. Everything is still serialized. See PLINQ on ConcurrentQueue isn't multithreading for a superior solution.

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You should consider using Greenplum. It's trivial to accomplish this in a Greenplum database. The free version isn't gimped in any way and it's postgresql at its core.

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Thanks. I am trying to achieve parallelism in my app, not in the database. Native Postgres is supposed to automatically use multiple cores as needed. –  Aren Cambre May 9 '11 at 16:19
    
Got it. You don't lose any performance by "pulling" the data out of the database? –  user677325 May 12 '11 at 22:48
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