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I was browsing some code in the linux kernel and I came across the statements like case '0' ... '9':

To try this out I created the test program below.

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    const int k = 15;

    switch (k)
    {
    case 0 ... 10:
        std::cout << "k is less than 10" << std::endl;
        break;
    case 11 ... 100:
        std::cout << "k is between 11 and 100" << std::endl;
        break;
    default:    
        std::cout << "k greater than 100" << std::endl;
        break;
    }
}   

The program above does compile although I have never come across the elipses in case statement construct before. Is this standard C and C++ or is this a GNU specific extension to the language?

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4  
Ah, the swan song of Visual Basic. –  Hans Passant May 8 '11 at 1:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

That is the case range extension of the GNU C compiler, it is not standard C or C++.

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That's an extension. Compiling your program with -pedantic gives:

example.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
example.cpp:9: error: range expressions in switch statements are non-standard
example.cpp:12: error: range expressions in switch statements are non-standard

clang gives even better warnings:

example.cpp:9:12: warning: use of GNU case range extension [-Wgnu]
    case 0 ... 10:
           ^
example.cpp:12:13: warning: use of GNU case range extension [-Wgnu]
    case 11 ... 100:
            ^
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Now, I wonder why that would be pedantic. I assume -Wall show the same? –  sehe May 7 '11 at 23:32
    
@sehe, -Wall does not show those warnings/errors for me, using either clang or gcc. –  Carl Norum May 7 '11 at 23:33
    
thx. That is kind of amazing, seeing how much emphasis is on standards compliance. I for one have never dreamed to even try using '...' in my switch statement :) –  sehe May 7 '11 at 23:35

This is a GCC extension to C, mentioned in this answer to what is basically a duplicate question, and confirmed in the GCC documentation.

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