Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

(Prompted by an answer.)

Given N3290, §7.1.6.2p4, where the list items are unnumbered, but numbered here for our convenience:

The type denoted by decltype(e) is defined as follows:

  1. if e is an unparenthesized id-expression or an unparenthesized class member access (5.2.5), decltype(e) is the type of the entity named by e. If there is no such entity, or if e names a set of overloaded functions, the program is ill-formed;
  2. otherwise, if e is an xvalue, decltype(e) is T&&, where T is the type of e;
  3. otherwise, if e is an lvalue, decltype(e) is T&, where T is the type of e;
  4. otherwise, decltype(e) is the type of e.

What is the type specified by decltype(0 + 0)?

Item 1 doesn't apply, 2 might, but if not, then 3 doesn't apply and 4 would be the result. So, what is an xvalue, and is 0 + 0 an xvalue?

§3.10p1:

An xvalue (an “eXpiring” value) also refers to an object, usually near the end of its lifetime (so that its resources may be moved, for example). An xvalue is the result of certain kinds of expressions involving rvalue references (8.3.2).

I don't see anything in §8.3.2 that would be helpful here, but I do know "0 + 0" doesn't involve any rvalue-references. The literal 0 is a prvalue, which is "an rvalue that is not an xvalue" (§3.10p1). I believe "0 + 0" is also a prvalue. If that's true, "decltype(0 + 0)" would be int (not int&&).

Have I missed something in my interpretation? Is this code well-formed?

decltype(0 + 0) x;  // Not initialized.

The code compiles on GCC 4.7.0 20110427 and Clang 2.9 (trunk 126116). It would not be well-formed if the decltype specified an int&& type, for example.

share|improve this question
3  
I don't see anything wrong with your reasoning. I believe that decltype(0 + 0) should be int, too. –  Charles Bailey May 8 '11 at 0:36
1  
FWIW, a good answer in the affirmative would be to expand on the definition of xvalue and show what it can and cannot be. (I would find that very helpful.) I need to see how to reword to focus on "what is an xvalue?" while still considering this concrete case of "0 + 0". –  Fred Nurk May 8 '11 at 0:43
2  
Although the latest draft does specify the value category for many expressions, including things like postfix increment and a note in 3.10 indicates that clause 5 should show the category of the value for each built-in operator, the draft doesn't seem to mention a value category for any of the binary operators from 5.6 to 5.15 unless my search powers have failed me. –  Charles Bailey May 8 '11 at 0:58
    
Disregarding of what the spec says, the intent is that 0 + 0 is a prvalue. lvalue = identity and not movable. xvalue = identity and movable. prvalue = no identity and movable. An xvalue is an expression that refers to an object (and objects in C++ have an unique identity, determined by address, type and lifetime), and that object may be moved from (is considered eXpiring). This is my silly explanation, of course not to be found in the spec. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 8 '11 at 1:19
2  
@Fred when rvalues are xvalues, they have identity. Example: int a; (int&&)a; the xvalue the cast yields refers to an object. Another, (int&&)2;, the temporary bound by the reference has identity. Its lifetime will end at the end of the full expression. A (non-class, non-array) prvalue has no identity. Example 2, which is no different from another 2 appearing in the code, or from 1+1, etc.. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 8 '11 at 5:19
show 1 more comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From 5.19 [expr.const], every literal constant expression is a prvalue.

A literal constant expression is a prvalue core constant expression of literal type, but not pointer type. An integral constant expression is a literal constant expression of integral or unscoped enumeration type.

Therefore rule 4 applies to all literal constant expressions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, though I still see a hole in the semantics (as pointed out by Charles in a comment on the question) for "int n = 42; decltype(0 + n)". :( –  Fred Nurk Jun 3 '11 at 2:00
    
@Fred: And of course, although the standard makes it clear that 0 + 0 is a core constant expression, its prvalue status remains in doubt. Obviously if it weren't a prvalue it couldn't be an integral constant expression and a LOT of things would break. –  Ben Voigt Jun 3 '11 at 2:02
    
You have this backwards: that paragraph is defining the term literal constant expression. –  Richard Smith Mar 21 '12 at 6:40
    
@Richard: That paragraph is indeed a definition. A definition provides necessary conditions, and can be used to argue about the properties of said items. There's nothing backwards. –  Ben Voigt Mar 21 '12 at 13:50
    
@BenVoigt You appear to be saying that 0 + 0 is a prvalue because it is a literal constant expression. However, in order to determine that 0 + 0 is a literal constant expression, we must first determine whether it is a prvalue, which is begging the question. Whether an expression is a constant expression does not affect its value category; a useful answer would refer to 3.10 or 5/6, which explain which expressions are xvalues. –  Richard Smith Mar 22 '12 at 7:35
show 1 more comment

0 + 0 is an expression of two prvalues, (n3290 par. 3.10) which applies the built-in operator+, which, per 13.6/12 is LR operator+(L,R), which is therefore a function that returns something that is not a reference. The result of the expression is therefore also a prvalue (as per 3.10).

Hence, the result of 0 + 0 is a prvalue, 0 is an int, therefore the result of 0 + 0 is an int

share|improve this answer
2  
§13.6p9 is unary operator+. You want §13.6p12. However, the draft says "These candidate functions participate in the operator overload resolution process as described in 13.3.1.2 and are used for no other purpose." (§13.6p1) I believe "no other purpose" means we can't use them to determine value category. +1 for a good answer anyway. –  Fred Nurk May 8 '11 at 2:59
    
@FredNurk - I edited the references. I must be getting tired... –  rlc May 8 '11 at 3:07
2  
the built-in operators are not function calls. So you cannot take 13.6/12 and get the described return type of those candidates and apply them back to clause 5. Those candidates of 13.6 are only active and relevant when you do overload resolution (if at least one operand is of class or enumeration type). And they are only used for converting class type operands. After that is done, control is completely given back to clause 5. That "LR operator+" is not an actual function that is somehow called. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 12 '11 at 5:02
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb I agree, but it's the closest thing in the (draft) standard to an answer to the question. Fact is that, as @Fred mentioned in chat, clause 3.10 promises that clause 5 will provide the semantics, and clause 5 breaks that promise. The closest thing we then have to something to plug the semantic hole is to consider the built-in operators as function calls, consider their prototypes in clause 13 as their definitions (despite the fact that the draft says that those candidate functions are used for no other purpose than overload resolution). and reason on from there. –  rlc May 12 '11 at 13:24
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb: More importantly for this discussion, the "used for no other purpose" notice explicitly disallows using §13.6p12 for the purpose of answering this question. –  Fred Nurk May 13 '11 at 1:18
show 2 more comments

It is definitely an int:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

template<typename T>
struct ref_depth
{
        enum { value = 0 };
};

template<typename T>
struct ref_depth<T&>
{
        enum { value = 1 };
};

template<typename T>
struct ref_depth<T&&>
{
        enum { value = 2 };
};

int main() {

  std::cout
    << "int: " << typeid(int).name() << "\n"
       "decltype(0 + 0): " << typeid(decltype(0 + 0)).name() << "\n"
       "int&&: " << typeid(int&&).name() << "\n";
  std::cout 
    << "ref_depth: int: " << ref_depth<int>::value << "\n"
       "ref_depth: decltype(0 + 0): " << ref_depth<decltype(0 + 0)>::value << "\n"
       "ref_depth: int&&: " << ref_depth<int&&>::value << "\n";

}

Output:

int: i
decltype(0 + 0): i
int&&: i
ref_depth: int: 0
ref_depth: decltype(0 + 0): 0
ref_depth: int&&: 2
share|improve this answer
2  
Could you please include the code in the answer? (Rather than summarizing the code's conclusion in the answer and linking to a completely different site.) –  Fred Nurk May 8 '11 at 3:21
1  
@Fred Nurk: I've taken the liberty. –  Jon Purdy May 8 '11 at 5:20
    
@Jon Purdy: Thanks, I was out all day. –  Khaled Nassar May 8 '11 at 11:29
add comment

Your reasoning is correct. An expression involving only constants is a constant by itself. Thus

decltype(0 + 0) x;

equals

decltype(0) x;

which equals

int x;
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't answer the question. Using zeros is a placeholder, and a good answer will show how to extrapolate to decltype(some_int + another_int) (or show why zero literals are special). –  Fred Nurk May 10 '11 at 9:14
add comment

GCC says int-

Code:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

int
main ()
{
  int n;
  decltype(0 + 0) x;
  std::cout << "Type of `n': " << typeid(n).name() << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Type of `x': " << typeid(x).name() << std::endl;
}

Output:

i

i

Edit: It makes sense according to point 4, but I can't say for sure that point 2 isn't actually the one in effect. From what I can tell, 0 + 0 is evaluated to 0, and the type of 0 is int, so that is the declared type.

share|improve this answer
1  
But it says the same thing for int&& as it does for int: ideone.com/6c6N6 –  Fred Nurk May 8 '11 at 0:51
    
That is true. Note that with GCC, int&& is the same as int. After all, a reference to an int IS an int. After all, a reference is only an alias in theory. Try if (typeid(int) == typeid(int&&)) { std::cout << "int == int&&" << std::endl; }. Even if the strings for them are the same, the actual typeid wouldn't be the same unless they're treated EXACTLY the same. This makes me wonder what's going on underneath it all... For now, I'd say that decltype(0 + 0) results in type int. –  Chrono Kitsune May 8 '11 at 1:11
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.