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So I'm working on a Zeller's Rule c program, trying to break a 4 digit int that represents the year of a specific date into 2 different int variables containing the first 2 digits and last 2 digits of said year.

void main()
{
    int day, month, year;
    .
    .
    .
    printf("Enter a Year: ");
    scanf("%i",&year);
    .
    .
    .
    int data, i;    
    int split[3];
    for(i=3 ; i>=0 ; i--)           //Problem is in the loop
    {
        data = year % 10;
        split[i] = data;
        year /= 10; 
        printf("Data%i: %i, should be %i\n", i, split[i], data);
    }
}

The above code outputs: (int year = 1234)

Data3: 0, should be 4
Data2: 0, should be 0
Data1: 0, should be 0
Data0: 0, should be 0

However, if i modify the loop labeled as the problem above as:

int data, i;    
int split[3];
for(i=3 ; i>=0 ; i--)      //Data is all there, correctly
{                          //Problem arises when I try to store to my array
    data = year % 10;
    year /= 10; 
    printf("Data%i: should be %i\n", i, data);
}

output of above code changes: (int year = 1234)

Data3: should be 4
Data2: should be 3
Data1: should be 2
Data0: should be 1

I am completely lost as to why the program 0's out everything as soon as I try to put the data that IS THERE into my array. Been giving me a headache for hours as I obviously have no idea what the problem is.

share|improve this question
1  
WEll in your first loop you access an invalid index. You try to access split[i] where i = 3; but only [0], [1], [2] are vlaid indexes for an array declared as int split[3] –  Chad May 8 '11 at 0:27
9  
void main RAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHH –  pmg May 8 '11 at 0:32
    
Ya, i'll be the first to admit that was a super stupid mistake.....I was under the impression that int split[3]; initialized an array of split[0], split[1], split[2], and split[3].....guess I'm just crazy, lol. Thanks for the help –  Stranger May 8 '11 at 0:34
    
@pmg, c is the oldest programming language I've stepped into, and everything else I code in has voids, sorry if it's not the legit old-school way to c-program, lol, it works –  Stranger May 8 '11 at 0:35
    
@Stranger: that's why it's so very bad! It works because your compiler implementation tries to be helpful and breaks the rules. Someday you have to use a unhelpful implementation to control the laser beam in a spaceship and the laser fires during the demo killing everybody on board :) –  pmg May 8 '11 at 0:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have 3 cells in your spit array (int split[3]), but you assign 4 times into it:

for(i=3 ; i>=0 ; i--)

change it to int split[4].

share|improve this answer
    
That was a super stupid mistake.....I was under the impression that int split[3]; initialized an array of split[0], split[1], split[2], and split[3].....guess I'm just crazy, lol. Thanks for the help –  Stranger May 8 '11 at 0:33
    
@Stranger - glad I could help :) –  MByD May 8 '11 at 0:33

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