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I'm trying to create a service container, and want to know how to reflect the type used when the method is called. See below:

public class ServiceContainer {

   HashMap<Type, Object> services;

   public ServiceContainer() {
      services = new HashMap<Type, Object>();
   }

   public <T> void addService(Type t, T object) {
      services.put(t, object);
   }
   public <T> void addService(T object) {
      Type type = typeof(T);
      services.put(type, object);
   }
}

I'd prefer to use the second addService, but if this isn't possible, it's something to fall back on.

EDIT: I think I found a solution for addService, but now there's another method that can't be solved in the same way:

public class ServiceContainer {
   HashMap<Class, Object> services;

   public ServiceContainer() {
      services = new HashMap<Class, Object>();
   }

   public <T> void addObject(T object) {
      Class type = object.getClass();
      services.put(type, object);
   }
   public <T> boolean containsService() {
   }
   public <T> T getService() {
      services.get(
         ServiceContainer.class.getMethod( "getService", null )
            .getGenericParameterTypes()[0] );
   }
}

I'm kind of shooting in the dark now, I should go brush up on some documentation...

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The second addService is not possible unless you map on the class name (instead of Type) - e.g.

public class ServiceContainer {
 HashMap<Class, Object> services;

 public ServiceContainer() {
     services = new HashMap<Class, Object>();
 }

 public <T> void addService(Class<T>, T object) {
     services.put(t, object);
 }
 public <T> void addService(T object) {
     Class type = object.getClass();
     services.put(type, object);
 }
}

the reason typeOfT() doesnt work is because java generics are "erased" after compilation. It is really only 'syntactic sugar' that the ocmpiler uses to check for obvious errors in type assignments.

edit: since the question changed: to implement the containsService method:

public boolean containsService(String classname) {
   return services.get(Class.forName(classname)) != null;
}

I'd say, given what you're doing is quite common, have a look into how you might use a dependency injection library to perform your service registrations and retrieval. I hear good things about Spring , and google Guice.

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1  
How would I go about answering containsService? And what is the difference between Class and Type. The java docs are kind of vague –  Caleb Jares May 8 '11 at 3:01
    
I would pass in either a Class literal (e.g., MyService.class), or even the name of the class, into the containsService method. –  Chii May 8 '11 at 5:03
    
I don't know what you mean by Type - i assumed it was a class you wrote yourself that designates the type of the service (unless you meant download.oracle.com/javase/1,5.0/docs/api/java/lang/reflect/… - which won't be useful in your case. –  Chii May 8 '11 at 5:04
    
I did go ahead and include a class literal in it. It's a one time thing most of the time, so it's not a big deal. –  Caleb Jares May 8 '11 at 5:15

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