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I have a control (derived from System.Windows.Forms.Control) which needs to be transparent in some areas. I have implemented this by using SetStyle():

public TransparentControl()
{
    SetStyle(ControlStyles.SupportsTransparentBackColor, true);
    this.BackColor = Color.Transparent.
}

Now, this works if there are no controls between the form and the transparent control. However, if there happens to be another control below the transparent control (which is the use case here), it does not work. The intermediate control is not draw, but the form below does show through. I can get the effect that I need by overriding CreateParams and setting the WS_EX_TRANSPARENT flasg like so:

protected override CreateParams CreateParams
{
    get
    {
        CreateParams cp = base.CreateParams;
        cp.ExStyle |= 0x20; // WS_EX_TRANSPARENT
        return cp;
    }
}

The problem here is that it really slows down the painting of the control. The control is already double buffered, so nothing to do there. The performance hit is so bad that it is unacceptable. Has anyone else encountered this problem? All of the resources that I can find suggest using method #1, but again, that does not work in my case.

EDIT: I should note that I do have a workaround. The child (transparent) controls could simply draw themselves onto the parent's Graphics object, but it is really ungly and I don't like the solution at all (though it may be all I have).

EDIT2: So, following the advice that I got on how transparency works in .NET, I have implemented the IContainer interface in my user control which contains the transparent controls. I have created a class which implements ISite, I add my child controls to the Components collection of the UserControl, the Container property lines up correctly in the debugger, but I still do not get a transparency effect. Does anyone have any ideas?

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7 Answers 7

Transparent controls in DotNet are implemented by having the transparent control's container draw itself in the transparent control's window and then having the transparent control draw itself. This process doesn't take into account the possibility of overlapping controls. So you will need to use some sort of work-around to make it work.

In some cases I've had success with complex nesting, but that's mostly only good for quick-and-dirty layering of bitmaps, and it doesn't solve any issues with partially overlapping controls.

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Thanks, I'll look into that. These controls are actually part of a user control, so perhaps I can implement the IContainer interface? –  Ed S. Feb 26 '09 at 23:15
    
It seems that the container property is null. I will fix that and post my results. –  Ed S. Feb 26 '09 at 23:18
    
I've edited the post with some more info, would you mind letting me know if you have any ideas? –  Ed S. Feb 27 '09 at 0:51

This is just a simple thing I cooked up.. The only issue I've found is that it doesn't update when the intersecting controls are updated..

It works by drawing a control that's behind/intersects with the current control to a bitmap, then drawing that bitmap to the current control..

protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
{
    if (Parent != null)
    {
        Bitmap behind = new Bitmap(Parent.Width, Parent.Height);
        foreach (Control c in Parent.Controls)
            if (c.Bounds.IntersectsWith(this.Bounds) & c != this)
                c.DrawToBitmap(behind, c.Bounds);
        e.Graphics.DrawImage(behind, -Left, -Top);
        behind.Dispose();
    }
}
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I found out that the modifications below make things a bit faster:

if((this.BackColor == Color.Transparent) && (Parent != null)) {
    Bitmap behind = new Bitmap(Parent.Width, Parent.Height);
    foreach(Control c in Parent.Controls) {
        if(c != this && c.Bounds.IntersectsWith(this.Bounds)) {
            c.DrawToBitmap(behind, c.Bounds);
        }
    }
    e.Graphics.DrawImage(behind, -Left, -Top);
    behind.Dispose();
}

I also think that using this.Width / this.Height instead of Parent.Width / Parent.Height would be even faster, but I didn't have time to tinker with it.

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1  
Thank you this works. But this.Width / this.Height don't work. I don't know why, and wanted to ask if anybody knows why. –  Hesham Eraqi Dec 17 '13 at 14:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I decided to simply paint the parent under my child controls manually. Here is a good article.

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This would work for drawing the parent under your control. But Have you got any idea on how to draw the siblings under your control ?? –  dtroy Apr 2 '09 at 23:39
    
thanks for this answer, it really put me in the right direction trying to implement a similar 'transparent control' –  Alex Aug 9 '12 at 21:04

Drawing the siblings under the control is possible, but it's ugly. The code below works reasonably well for me, it expands on the code given in the link above.

Possible pitfalls:

  • DrawToBitmap was introduced with .net 2.0, so don't expect it to work with anything older than that. But even then something like this may be possible by sending WM_PRINT to the sibling control; AFAIK that's what DrawToBitmap does internally.
  • It may also have problems if you have controls under your control that make use of WS_EX_TRANSPARENT since according to msdn that window style fiddles with the painting order. I haven't got any controls that use this style so I can't tell.
  • I'm running XP SP3 with VS2010, therefore this approach may have additional problems on Vista or W7.

Here's the code:

if (Parent != null)
{
    float
        tx = -Left,
        ty = -Top;

    // make adjustments to tx and ty here if your control
    // has a non-client area, borders or similar

    e.Graphics.TranslateTransform(tx, ty);

    using (PaintEventArgs pea = new PaintEventArgs(e.Graphics,e.ClipRectangle))
    {
        InvokePaintBackground(Parent, pea);
        InvokePaint(Parent, pea);
    }

    e.Graphics.TranslateTransform(-tx, -ty);

    // loop through children of parent which are under ourselves
    int start = Parent.Controls.GetChildIndex(this);
    Rectangle rect = new Rectangle(Left, Top, Width, Height);
    for (int i = Parent.Controls.Count - 1; i > start; i--)
    {
        Control c = Parent.Controls[i];

        // skip ...
        // ... invisible controls
        // ... or controls that have zero width/height (Autosize Labels without content!)
        // ... or controls that don't intersect with ourselves
        if (!c.Visible || c.Width == 0 || c.Height == 0 || !rect.IntersectsWith(new Rectangle(c.Left, c.Top, c.Width, c.Height)))
            continue;

        using (Bitmap b = new Bitmap(c.Width, c.Height, e.Graphics))
        {
            c.DrawToBitmap(b, new Rectangle(0, 0, c.Width, c.Height));

            tx = c.Left - Left;
            ty = c.Top - Top;

            // make adjustments to tx and ty here if your control
            // has a non-client area, borders or similar

            e.Graphics.TranslateTransform(tx, ty);
            e.Graphics.DrawImageUnscaled(b, new Point(0, 0));
            e.Graphics.TranslateTransform(-tx, -ty);
        }
}
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Some suggestions. Apologies for the VB code.

Try to avoid painting the background:


    Protected Overrides Sub WndProc(ByRef m As System.Windows.Forms.Message)
        If m.Msg = &H14 Then
            Return
        End If
        MyBase.WndProc(m)
    End Sub


    Protected Overrides Sub OnPaintBackground(ByVal pevent As System.Windows.Forms.PaintEventArgs)
        Return
    End Sub

Don't call the controls base paint method:


    Protected Overrides Sub OnPaint(ByVal e As System.Windows.Forms.PaintEventArgs)
        'MyBase.OnPaint(e) - comment out - do not call
    End Sub

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Thank you, but I have tried that already (though I didn't say so). –  Ed S. Feb 26 '09 at 23:07

This does the trick, at least it has for me:

protected override void OnPaintBackground(PaintEventArgs e)
{
    //base.OnPaintBackground(e);
    this.CreateGraphics().DrawRectangle(new Pen(Color.Transparent, 1), new Rectangle(0, 0, this.Size.Width, this.Size.Height));
}
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This will not allow you to "see through" a control onto others. Also, your PaintEventArgs gives you a Graphics object, no need to create and leak one. –  Ed S. Aug 9 '13 at 0:10

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