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I just ran into this while going through the Erlang compiler source.

I'm not really getting it. (go figure ;)), considering that I just realized that there is such a thing 5 minutes ago).

Forgive me for asking first without first trying to understand reasons for its existence.

There is a wikipedia article about it, but it is pretty cryptic.

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1  
Read about closures first -- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Closure_(computer_science) – dirkgently Feb 26 '09 at 21:55

Lambda lifting is used to turn a closure into a pure function. By passing extra arguments to the function, you reduce the number of its free variables. As you "lift" the lambda into higher and higher scopes, you add arguments to accommodate the local variables declared in that scope (which would be free variables otherwise). Once the lambda has no free variables it is a pure "top level" function.

Of course you can only do this if you know all the lambda's call sites; in other words, only if the lambda does not escape.

The benefit in a compiler optimizer is that closures (function environments) can be eliminated. This might make it possible to pass the arguments in registers rather than stack (or heap) allocating them as free variables.

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so a free variable in closures sense is one thats coming from its lexical environment (scope of its definition?). a top level function is (in erlangs case) a module function? what about a unbound variable thats already in a module level function, is it free as well? thanks for the detailed answer – deepblue Feb 26 '09 at 21:59
    
Yes, yes, maybe. – Doug Currie Feb 26 '09 at 22:13
3  
The reason you need to know all call sites is because you need to update all calls to the function by adding the extra parameter (x in my JavaScript example). – Tom Lokhorst Feb 26 '09 at 22:19
2  
Escapes down means it is passed to a known function, and that function doesn't let it escape up. So, the lifetime of the closure is smaller than the lifetime of the enclosing function, so it can be stack allocated. – Doug Currie Feb 27 '09 at 1:33
4  
Escapes up means the closure outlives the environment in which is is created. It could be stored in a data structure that escapes up, or it could be passed to a function that may let it escape, or it could be returned by the function that creates it. So, the environment must be on the heap. – Doug Currie Feb 27 '09 at 1:34

Lambda lifting is a technique to `lift' lambdas to a higher level (mostly to the top level).

Doug Currie describes why you would want to do this.

Here's some example code (in JavaScript) of how you could do this manually:

function addFive(nr)
{
  var x = 5;
  function addX(y)
  {
    return x + y;
  }

  return addX(nr);
}

Now if you don't want this addX function inside the definition of addFive you could `lift' it to the top level like so:

function addX(y)
{
  return x + y;
}

function addFive(nr)
{
  var x = 5;

  return addX(nr);
}

However, this won't work, since the x variable isn't available anymore in the context of the addX function. The way to fix this is to add an extra formal parameter to the function:

function addX(y, x)
{
  return x + y;
}

function addFive(nr)
{
  var x = 5;

  return addX(nr, x);
}


Addition: Here's a very contrived example of a lambda `escaping'. Where you won't be able to do the lambda lifting as easily as I've described.

function getAddFiveFunc()
{
  var x = 5;
  function addX(y)
  {
    return x + y;
  }

  return addX;
}

Now if someone calls the getAddFiveFunc function, they will get a function back. This function could be used at all sorts of places, Now, if you do want to lift the addX function, you will have to update all those callsites.

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very simple example, I get it now:) thank you. so a free variable is considered to be one thats "pulled" from the surrounding lexical environment of the closure? aaaah, so the way lifting speeds things up is that you no longer have to carry the lexical environment for every closure? – deepblue Feb 26 '09 at 22:08
    
I was just going to ask you about what happens when the closure is returned from its container function.so say I still want to lift it, how will I expose the local vars of the container func to the outside callers of the closure(in order to pass them as parameters)? – deepblue Feb 26 '09 at 22:33
    
If your compiler has access to the complete program at compile-time, it will be able to update all call sites. However, most compilers allow for separate compilation, where each module is compiled separately. In that case, if the lambda crosses module boundaries, lambda lifting won't be possible. – Tom Lokhorst Feb 26 '09 at 22:46
    
understood.it makes sense that erlang wouldnt lift accross module boundaries since it allows for dynamic reloading of modules without needing to recompile the rest, and as long as the exported function signatures stay the same the rest can be changed.thanks for the good examples – deepblue Feb 26 '09 at 22:50
    
Lambda lifting would still be possible if the function is stored along with a data structure which contains its environment. Each caller then would have to pass also the environment. – MauganRa Sep 19 '11 at 21:57

Warning: My answer actually describes captured variables which is different than lambda lifting. Misread the question (need sleep). But I spent a bit of time writing this up so I'm loathe to delete it. Left it up as a community WIKI.

Lambda lifting, often referred to as closures, is a way of seamlessly allowing access of in scope variables from within a nested lambda expression.

It's hard to get into the nitty gritty details of closures without picking a particular language. One of the side effects of lambda lifting, in any langauge, is that it tends to extend the lifetime of a variable from a local, short lived scope, to a much longer lived scope. Usually this occurs in the form of transferring a variable from the stack to the heap within the compiler. This is a very language specific action and therefore produces very different implementations based on the language.

I'll focus on C# since that's probably the language most common to the readers of stack overflow. Lets start with the following code.

public Func<int> GetAFunction() {
  var x = 42;
  Func<int> lambda1 = () => x;
  Func<int> lambda2 = () => 42;
  ...
  return lambda1;
}

In this example we've created 2 lambda expressions. In both cases it's assigned to a delegate instance of type Func. All delegates in .Net require that a real function be backing them somewhere. So under the hood, all lambda expressions/ anonymous functions in C# are translated into a method definition.

Generating a function for lambda2 is pretty straight forward. It's an isolated function that just returns a constant value.

public static int RealLambda2() { 
  return 42;
}

Generating lambda1 is quite a bit harder. A literal definition would look like the following

public static int RealLambda1() {
  return x;
}

This obviously won't compile because x is not accessible. In order to make this work, the C# compiler must lift the variable x into a closure. It can then return a pointer to a function within the closure to satisfy the delegate expression

class Closure1 {
  int x;
  public int RealLambda1() {
    return x;
  }
}

This is a pretty simple example but should hopefully detail the art of lifting. The devil is unfortunately in the details and gets much more complex with the scenario.

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1  
You are talking about captured variables, not lambda lifting. – leppie Feb 27 '09 at 4:20
    
@leppie, you're correct, I need to get some sleep – JaredPar Feb 27 '09 at 4:28
    
The definition you wrote up is widely used by Microsoft. See, for example, <msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163362.aspx>;. – Neal Gafter May 6 '11 at 20:47

lambda lifting basically eliminates variables and puts them into pure functions, simplifying the execution.

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why does that simplify execution?sorry for the blunt question.Wikipedia article mentioned the same thing, namely that the purpose of lifting is to speed things up.every little thing points me in the right direction. thanks – deepblue Feb 26 '09 at 22:02
    
@deepblue (+4 years later) because there's no need to maintain the environment that hosts the values of free variables; all the free variables are converted to arguments so it is only the arguments that we have to deal with, in order to evaluate/execute the function. maintaining the environment, keeping it alive long after the scope in which the closure was created was exited, is/might be a complex task, depending on a language. E.g. in Scheme it is very complex. – Will Ness Apr 2 '13 at 7:45

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