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I have the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>

int main()
{
   std::cout << std::numeric_limits<unsigned long long>::digits10 << std::endl;
   return 0;
}
  • GCC 4.4 returns 19
  • MS VS 9.0 returns 18

Can someone please explain Why is there a difference between the two? I would have expected such a constant would be the same regardless of the compiler.

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I no longer have an installation of VC9 but VC10 prints 19, which is the expected value since unsigned long long is represented by 64 bits and thus its maximum value is 18,446,744,073,709,551,615. –  James McNellis May 8 '11 at 6:41
    
VC9 prints 19 for me, too. –  Marlon May 8 '11 at 6:43
    
@James, that's where I'm lost: there are 20 digits in 18,446,744,073,709,551,615, not 19. So why does limit10 return 19 (or 18)? –  Frédéric Hamidi May 8 '11 at 6:44
1  
@Rikardo, maybe limit10 is only meaningful for floating-point types? –  Frédéric Hamidi May 8 '11 at 6:47
8  
@Frederic: unsigned long long can represent 9,999,999,999,999,999,999 (19 digits) but not 99,999,999,999,999,999,999 (20 digits). It can represent every 19 digit number but not every 20 digit number. [Sorry, I had commented earlier but I realized it was not entirely correct so I removed that comment.] –  James McNellis May 8 '11 at 6:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

If Visual C++ 2008 returns 18 for std::numeric_limits<unsigned long long>::digits10, it is a bug (I don't have Visual C++ 2008 installed to verify the described behavior).

In Visual C++ (at least for 32-bit and 64-bit Windows), unsigned long long is a 64-bit unsigned integer type and is capable of representing all of the integers between zero and 18,446,744,073,709,551,615 (264 - 1).

Therefore, the correct value for digits10 here is 19 because an unsigned long long can represent 9,999,999,999,999,999,999 (19 digits) but cannot represent 99,999,999,999,999,999,999 (20 digits). That is, it can represent every 19 digit number but not every 20 digit number.

When compiled with Visual C++ 2010, your program prints the expected 19.

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1  
why not 20 digits? 19 seems to miss 1 digit. how does one represent 18446744073709551615 with 19 digits? –  Rikardo Koder May 8 '11 at 6:51
    
@Rikardo: unsigned long long can represent 9,999,999,999,999,999,999 (19 digits) but not 99,999,999,999,999,999,999 (20 digits). It can represent every 19 digit number but not every 20 digit number. –  James McNellis May 8 '11 at 6:52
5  
oooooooh. I see, so its an issue of infimum and supremum. Thanks! –  Rikardo Koder May 8 '11 at 6:55

I would have expected such a constant would be the same regardless of the compiler.

This is not correct. A compiler can implement any value as long as it comforms to the standards. For example some weird compilers on a 32 or 64-bit computer may have CHAR_BIT = 9 and unsigned long long wouldn't be 64 bit any more, or it may use different 1's complement or some other number encodings, so the result may vary between compilers.

I've just check and VS 2008 still returns 19. Maybe because of one of the hotfixes when updating. VS2008 result

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numeric_limits::digits10 specifies the number of decimal digits to the left of the decimal point that can be represented without a loss of precision. So, I guess it will differ from compiler to compiler depending on their implementation detail.

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1  
You've just quoted the msdn docs, you have NOT provided an answer to the question, only added unrelated supposition. –  Rikardo Koder May 8 '11 at 6:30
    
@Rikardo Koder: Well, If its a implementation detail of compiler it will differ for each compiler and well as you know floating point number are evil, you never can be sure of what accuracy each compiler is going to provide you. I guess this supposition is a reasoning enough for me to consider it as an answer. –  Alok Save May 8 '11 at 6:33
4  
unsigned long long is an integral type, not a floating point type. –  Drew Hall May 8 '11 at 6:36

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