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This should be very trivial. I was running through a very basic C program for comparing strings:

#include <stdio.h>  
int strcmp(char *s, char *t);
int main()
{
    printf("Returned: %d\n", strcmp("abc", "adf"));
    return 0;
}

int strcmp(char *s, char *t)
{
    printf("Blah\n");
    while (*s++ == *t++)
    {
        if (*s == '\0')
            return 0;
    }
    return *s - *t;
}

So I've basically implemented my own version of the strcmp function already present in string.h. When I run the above code, I only see return values of 0, 1, or -1 (at least for my small set of test cases) instead of the actual expected results. Now I do realize that this is because the code doesn't go to my implemented version of strcmp, but instead uses the string.h version of the function, but I'm confused as to why this is the case even when I haven't included the appropriate header file.

Also, seeing how it does use the header file version, shouldn't I be getting a 'multiple implementations' error (or something along those lines) when compiling the code?

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your last test *s++ == *t++ which could fail will still increment your pointers… is that what you want? –  Benoit May 8 '11 at 8:03
    
Yep, you're right. That last line should be return *(--s) - *(--t) –  M.K. May 8 '11 at 18:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You're using gcc, right? gcc implements some functions as built-ins in the compiler and it seems that strcmp is one of those. Try compiling your file with the -fno-builtin switch.

Header files just tell the compiler that certain symbols, macros, and types exist. Including or not including a header file won't have any effect on where functions come from, that's the linker's job. If gcc was pulling strcmp out of libc then you probably would see a warning.

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+1 this is the part of the answer that I didn't know :) –  MByD May 8 '11 at 6:52
1  
my answer seems like a one big mistake... deleted... –  MByD May 8 '11 at 6:59
    
I was sure it wasn't posted, it's a shame... –  MByD May 8 '11 at 7:03
1  
and BTW "mu is too short" is way too long :) –  MByD May 8 '11 at 7:07

Not as elegant as the earlier answers, another way to get this done

#include <stdio.h>  
static int strcmp(char *s, char *t); /* static makes it bind to file local sym */
int main()
{
    printf("Returned: %d\n", strcmp("abc", "adf"));
    return 0;
}

int strcmp(char *s, char *t)
{
    printf("Blah\n");
    while (*s++ == *t++)
    {
        if (*s == '\0')
            return 0;
    }
    return *s - *t;
}
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Without knowing what compiler and lib. version you use, all conclusion are only 'possibility'. So the most reasonable thing that stdio.h already includes stdlib.h or string.h

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strcmp is the name of a standard library function. As such you are only permitted to declare the function (although you must use a correct declaration); you are not permitted to provide another definition for it. The implementation can assume that whenever you use strcmp you are referring to the standard library function even if you haven't used the correct #include for it.

If you want to provide an alternative strcmp then you should give it an alternative name.

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I can provide redefinition of most library functions. Most of them are declared weak in glibc; also, standard says only about definition in the header. If no header is included, there is no any "library function" and I can declare anything, even the y0() or define somthing in non-standard way, e.g. double strcmp(int, float*). Many implementations allow user to turn off the assumption about standard library (-fno-builtin or -ffreestanding). Standard says about library in "Hosted environment" (conforming hosted implementation), but there is a conforming freestanding implementation. –  osgx Jul 21 '11 at 8:55

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