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I have a list of dictionaries as shown below. Each dictionary holds the total for a particular month. If a month doesn't appear in the list, for example January, it's total should be zero.

q = [{'total_item': 3, 'month': u'02'}, {'total_item': 1, 'month': u'03'}, {'total_item': 1, 'month': u'05'}, {'total_item': 5, 'month': u'06'}, {'total_item': 6, 'month': u'07'}, {'total_item': 1, 'month': u'10'}, {'total_item': 1, 'month': u'12'}]

I want to convert the above data structure to a simple list, where the ordinal position represent the month and the value represents the total items.

[0, 3, 1, 0, ...] # 12 entries in total - one for each month

That is Jan is 0, Feb is 3, March is 1 etc.

I know I can use something like this to get the values present:

result = [r['total_item'] for r in q]

but how do I create zero value entries for the months that are not present?

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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just loop over the list, and assign according to the value of month.

total_items = [0]*12
for d in q:
  month = int(d['month'], 10)
  total_items[month-1] = d['total_item']
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result = [0]*12
for r in q:
    result[int(r['month'])-1] = r['total_item']
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this yields an IndexError on December :) –  Mihai Oprea May 8 '11 at 19:01
    
It shouldn't, if January is 0... but apparently the input data is using January as 1 which is easy to fix. –  Amber May 8 '11 at 19:06
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Use this:

class MyDict(dict):
    def __missing__(self, key):
        self[key] = 0
        return self[key]

And then you can use this object instead of a normal dictionary. It acts just like it, but when you access an item that doesn't exist, it will create it with a value of 0.

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Why not to use collections.defaultdict? –  rubik May 8 '11 at 19:02
    
Because I'm a sadist –  Chris May 8 '11 at 19:43
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try:

>>> months = [0] * 12
>>> for r in q: months[int(r['month'])-1] = r['total_item']
>>> months
[0, 3, 1, 1, 1, 5, 6, 6, 0, 1, 1, 1]
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Perhaps you might want to use scikits.timeseries:

http://pytseries.sourceforge.net/

For example:

import scikits.timeseries as TS
aDate = TS.Date('M', '2010-01-01')
myTS = TS.time_series(myData, start_date = aDate, freq = 'M')

From there you can fill missing values with zeros and export (I believe using myTS.fill(0)).

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And one more way to do it ... map existing months to their total_item values and then use dict.get() with a default of 0:

nitems = dict((int(x['month']), x['total_item']) for x in q)
result = [nitems.get(i, 0) for i in range(1, 13)]
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It is nitems.get(i+1, 0) –  eyquem May 8 '11 at 20:23
    
@eyquem: you're right, thanks, just fixed the example code –  Oben Sonne May 10 '11 at 18:16
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A shorter approach (Python ≥ 2.7 because of the dict comprehension):

>>> d={int(i["month"]):i["total_item"] for i in q} #create a easier to use dict
>>> d
{2: 3, 3: 1, 5: 1, 6: 5, 7: 6, 10: 1, 12: 1}
>>> [d.get(i,0) for i in range(1,13)] #d.get(i,0) returns 0 if i not in dict
[0, 3, 1, 0, 1, 5, 6, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1]
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