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I'm attempting to produce some classes to control a model-view-presenter application. I've come up with the following definitions, but am struggling to avoid recursive generics.

public abstract class Presenter<V extends View<...?>> {

  protected V view;

  public Presenter(V view) {
    this.view = view;
  }

  // ...
}


public abstract class View<P extends Presenter<...?>> {

  protected P presenter;

  // ...
}

I wanted to enforce a mutual relationship between the two classes. The idea being that I could instantiate a Presenter for a particular View, with both classes relying on useful methods defined in the abstract base classes, yet both knowing exactly what subclass of the counterpart abstract class is in use.

My issues is the defining the ..? part of the code. I can't see a way to avoid a recursive situation, such as:

public abstract class View<P extends Presenter<V>, V extends View<Q>, Q extends...>

and even that definition is not consistent, as the View class now takes two generic parameters... mass confusion.

I basically wanted to avoid the classes being littered with references to the abstract class type, necessitating lots of casting throughout the concrete implementations, as below:

// simpler option

public abstract class Presenter {

  protected View view;    

  public Presenter(View view) {
    this.view = view;
  }
}

public class FooPresenter extends Presenter {

  public FooPresenter(BarView view) {
    super(view);
  }

  public someMethod() {
    ((BarView) getView()).viewSpecificMethod();
  }
}

Each concrete implementation of these classes would need to constantly cast from the abstract type to the type it "knows" is in use.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try

public abstract class Presenter<V extends View<? extends Presenter<?>>>

and

public abstract class View<P extends Presenter<? extends View<?>>>

This would restrict presenters to have any view as their generic parameter and views to have any presenter.

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Excellent, that's done the trick! Thanks. –  Duncan May 8 '11 at 19:53
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Use a second type parameter for the type of this:

class Presenter<P extends Presenter<P,V>, V extends View<P,V>> {
    V view;
}

class View<P extends Presenter<P,V>, V extends View<P,V>> {
    P presenter;
}

class MyPresenter extends Presenter<MyPresenter, MyView>{}

class MyView extends View<MyPresenter, MyView>{}

Then you can do:

MyPresenter mp = new MyPresenter().view.presenter;
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Thanks for the response. Does this design offer advantages over the current solution? Also, is the .view.presenter clause necessary? –  Duncan May 8 '11 at 20:38
    
@Duncan Jones "Does this design offer advantages over the current solution?" like @Thomas said, "This would restrict presenters to have any view as their generic parameter and views to have any presenter." I am convinced that THIS is the correct answer since I am quite certain the other can have a type hole, although I don't have the time to prove it right now. –  ArtB Jun 10 '11 at 18:06
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