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For example I have a class called DeckOfCards and array char *suit[ 4 ].

class DeckOfCards
{
public:
    // some stuff

private:
    char *suit[ 4 ];
};

Where I can initialize this array in such a way? char *suit[ 4 ] = { "Hearts", "Diamonds", "Clubs", "Spades" } I guess it can be done using constructor, but I don't know how exactly to do it.

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2 Answers

You could create it as a static variable in the class, like this:

class DeckOfCards
{
public:
  DeckOfCards() {
    printf("%s\n", suit[0]);
  }

private:
  static const char *suit[];
};

const char *DeckOfCards::suit[] = { "Hearts", "Diamonds", "Clubs", "Spades" };

int main(void)
{
  DeckOfCards deck;
  return 0;
}
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I can't create it as a static variable because in some functions of this class I copy elements from suit array to another array. –  Alex May 8 '11 at 20:48
    
I don't understand what having a static array has to do with the inability to copy values later on. –  Joce May 8 '11 at 21:02
    
sorry, I confused something. I'll try to create it as static variable. –  Alex May 8 '11 at 21:29
    
Anyway, I just tried to copy an element from const char suit* to another char* (non-constant) array like this: dealedSuits[ dealedFcounter ] = suit[ row ]; and MSVC++ shows me an error that value of type const char* cannot be assigned to char* –  Alex May 9 '11 at 6:35
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Try this:

DeckOfCards::DeckOfCards()
    :suit{ "Hearts", "Diamonds", "Clubs", "Spades" }
{}

If that doesn't work, then your compiler doesn't support that feature of C++ yet. So you'll need to do it the old fashion way:

DeckOfCards::DeckOfCards()    
{
    suit[0] = "Hearts";
    suit[1] = "Diamonds";
    suit[2] = "Clubs";
    suit[3] = "Spades";
}

If you're going to use char pointers like that though, you should make them const, i.e.:

const char *suit[ 4 ];

Reason being, you can't modify the strings anyway, string literals reside in read-only memory. By declaring it const, at least the compiler will tell you your problem if you try to modify it. Better to avoid all that and just use std::string.

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