Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to start organizing my code properly, so I wanto to use object literals. In the following case, I'm doing a pseudo class. I would like that init() could work as a constructor, but unforuntately, I'm not seeing how to set attributes based on object context.

var car = {
context : this,
wheels : 0,
color : '',
speed : 0,
init : (function(x){
    console.log(x);
    x.wheels = 4;
    x.color = 'red';
    x.speed = 120;
})(context)

};

console.log(car.color);

share|improve this question
    
What exactly you are trying to achieve? And how is it different from say: var car = new Car(); –  c-smile May 8 '11 at 21:00
    
An Object object doesn't have a this property, only Function objects do. And in a function, this is a keyword that belongs to the activation object (effectively a variable), it is not a public property. Finally, a function's this is set by the call, you can't set it statically (though you can sort of using ES5 and bind). –  RobG May 8 '11 at 23:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't immediately run a function like that whilst declaring an object literal. What you can do:

var car = {
init : function(wheels,color,speed){
    this.wheels = wheels || 0;
    this.color = color || '';
    this.speed = speed || 0;
    return this;
  }
}.init(4,'red',120);

alert(car.speed); //=>120

Which removes the need for:

context : this,
wheels : 0,
color : '',
speed : 0,

...and offers the possibility for:

var car = {
    init : function(wheels,color,speed){
      this.wheels = wheels || 0;
      this.color = color || '';
      this.speed = speed || 0;
      return this;
     }
    },
    redAndFast = car.init(4,'red',230),
    threeWheeler = car.init(3,'yellowstriped',110);

[edit] What was I thinking? If you want more instances of Car, you'll have to use a real constructor function instead of an object literal:

var Car = function(){
  return {
    init : function(wheels,color,speed){
            this.wheels = wheels || 0;
            this.color = color || '';
            this.speed = speed || 0;
            return this;
  }
 }
},
redAndFast = new Car().init(4,'red',230),
threeWheeler = new Car().init(3,'yellowstriped',110);

Which can be simplified to:

var Car = function(wheels,color,speed){
            this.wheels = wheels || 0;
            this.color = color || '';
            this.speed = speed || 0;
    },
    redAndFast = new Car(4,'red',230),
    threeWheeler = new Car(3,'yellowstriped',110);

Or if you wanted to cling on to some init like function:

var Car = (function(){
    function car(wheels,color,speed){
            this.wheels = wheels || 0;
            this.color = color || '';
            this.speed = speed || 0;
    }
    return {
        init: function(w,c,s){
            return new car(w,c,s);
        }
    };
 })(),
 redAndFast   = Car.init(4,'red',230),
 threeWheeler = Car.init(3,'yellowstriped',110);

But hey, what happened to my context? you may ask. Well, it turns out you didn't need it after all. Isn't javascript a beautiful and flexible language?

share|improve this answer
    
wow! :) thanks a lot for your time!! –  punkbit May 8 '11 at 22:23
    
Could someone explain, what the outer brackets in var Car = (function...)() are doing? I guess they execute that function at parse time, but why is this required? (and yes, it seems to be required, otherwise 'has no method init' is thrown when trying to execute init) Do we always need to execute functions at parse time when exposing inner functions? –  Michel Müller Jul 25 '13 at 10:58
var Car = function() {
    this.wheels = 4;
    this.color = 'red';
    this.speed = 120;
}

var car = new Car();

It's best to use normal constructors for these kind of tasks.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 from me, I like plain, simple constructors. Having a constructor return some other object than this is just a waste of an object and creates needless complexity. The constructor is the init function. :-) –  RobG May 8 '11 at 23:20

Object literals work for singletons. If you want an instantiable object, you'll need to learn how js oop works and just use function objects.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.