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I need to count all X, that some_predicate(X) and there really a lot of such X. What is the best way to do that?

First clue is to find it all, accumulate to a list and return it length.

countAllStuff( X ) :-
    findall( Y
           , permutation( [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10], Y )
           , List
           ),
    length( List, X ).

(permutation/2 is only example showing that there are many variants and it's bad way to collect it all)

Obviously, I have stack-overflow.

?- countAllStuff( X ).
ERROR: Out of global stack

Than, I'm trying to replace findall to setof and nothing changes.

At last, I've founded aggregate(clickable) predicates and trying to use it.

?- aggregate(count, permutation([1,2,3,4], X), Y ).
X = [1, 2, 3, 4],
Y = 1 .

?- aggregate(count, [1,2,3,4], permutation([1,2,3,4], X), Y ).
X = [1, 2, 3, 4],
Y = 1 ;
X = [1, 2, 4, 3],
Y = 1 ;

It's all wrong, I think. I'm prefer to get something like

?- aggregate(count, permutation([1,2,3,4], X), Y ).
Y = 24 .

1) What am I doing wrong?

2) How can I declare predicate to get right answer?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use an existentially quantified variable, as you would with setof:

?- aggregate(count, X^permutation([1,2,3,4], X), N).
N = 24.
share|improve this answer
    
What is X^permutation in that case? – ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ May 8 '11 at 21:14
4  
@garm0nboz1a: X^ means "there exists X", so the whole formula means something like "count the number of ways that permutation([1,2,3,4],X) succeeds for some X and call that number N." – larsmans May 8 '11 at 21:15

There is also aggregate_all/3:

?- aggregate_all(count, permutation([1, 2, 3, 4], _), Total).
Total = 24.

However, as far as runtime and stack overflows are concerned it seems to perform equally well to your findall+length solution:

?- N is 10^7, time(aggregate_all(count, between(1, N, _), Total)).
% 10,000,022 inferences, 5.075 CPU in 5.089 seconds (100% CPU, 1970306 Lips)
N = Total, Total = 10000000.

?- N is 10^7, time((findall(X, between(1, N, _), L), length(L, Total))).
% 10,000,013 inferences, 4.489 CPU in 4.501 seconds (100% CPU, 2227879 Lips)
N = 10000000,
L = [_G30000569, _G30000566, _G30000545|...],
Total = 10000000.

?- N is 10^8, aggregate_all(count, between(1, N, _), Total).
ERROR: Out of global stack

?- N is 10^8, findall(X, between(1, N, _), L), length(L, Total).
ERROR: Out of global stack

You can count the solutions using assert/retract, this is quite slow but does avoid the "out of stack" problem:

?- assert(counter(0)), N is 10^8, between(1, N, _),
   retract(counter(C)), C1 is C + 1, assert(counter(C1)), fail
   ; retract(counter(C)).
C = 100000000.
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In SWI-Prolog there is a much more efficient version, that also avoid locking the global store. So simply using nb_setval and nb_getval you gain at least 3 times the performance (more on multithreading). Just little time ago another question was on counting solutions. Being the base of aggregation it's an obvious stop point while learning Prolog. To evaluate the efficiency gain we get using these monothread semantically equivalent calls:

count_solutions(Goal, N) :-
assert(count_solutions_store(0)),
repeat,
(   call(Goal),
    retract(count_solutions_store(SoFar)),
    Updated is SoFar + 1,
    assert(count_solutions_store(Updated)),
    fail
;   retract(count_solutions_store(N))
), !.
:- dynamic count_solutions_store/1.

% no declaration required here
count_solutions_nb(Goal, N) :-
    nb_setval(count_solutions_store, 0),
    repeat,
    (   call(Goal),
        nb_getval(count_solutions_store, SoFar),
        Updated is SoFar + 1,
        nb_setval(count_solutions_store, Updated),
        fail
    ;   nb_getval(count_solutions_store, N)
    ), !.

parent(jane,dick).
parent(michael,dick).
parent(michael,asd).

numberofchildren(Parent, N) :-
    count_solutions_nb(parent(Parent, _), N).

many_solutions :-
    between(1, 500000, _).

time_iso :-
    time(count_solutions(many_solutions, N)),
    write(N), nl.

time_swi :-
    time(count_solutions_nb(many_solutions, N)),
    writeln(N).

On my system, i get

?- [count_sol].
% count_sol compiled 0,00 sec, 244 bytes
true.

?- time_iso.
tim% 1,000,006 inferences, 2,805 CPU in 2,805 seconds (100% CPU, 356510 Lips)
500000
true.

?- time_swi.
% 2,000,010 inferences, 0,768 CPU in 0,768 seconds (100% CPU, 2603693 Lips)
500000
true.
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