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I have the following Java code to read a txt file:

    class ReadFile {
        public static void main(String [] args) {
        File archivo = null;
        FileReader fr = null;
        BufferedReader br = null;

      try {
         archivo = new File ("C:\\archivo.txt");
         fr = new FileReader (archivo);
         br = new BufferedReader(fr);

         String line;
         while((line=br.readLine())!=null)
            System.out.println(line);
      }
      catch(Exception e){
         e.printStackTrace();
      }finally{
         try{                    
            if( null != fr ){   
               fr.close();     
            }                  
         }catch (Exception e2){ 
            e2.printStackTrace();
         }
      }
   }

But I need to load that info into a JList, so this JList would show me what words I have saved in the file. Does anyone knows how to do that?

share|improve this question
    
What is a 'listbox'? There is no such class in the J2SE. – Andrew Thompson May 8 '11 at 21:07
2  
What UI are you using? Swing? JSP? JSF? etc – BalusC May 8 '11 at 21:08
    
Please use the code tags when posting code. To do that, select the code sample and click the {} button above the message input form. I tidied the code above a little, but also in future use a logical and consistent indent for code sections. – Andrew Thompson May 8 '11 at 21:10
    
I believe in Java it's called a JList (Check it out here [link]java2s.com/Code/Java/Swing-JFC/…). Thanks Andrew for that! :) – mandy May 8 '11 at 21:10
    
Ah, it's Swing? You should mention and tag as such. I've edited the question. – BalusC May 8 '11 at 21:14
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Source

import java.io.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import java.util.Vector;

class ReadFile {

    public static void main(String [] args) {
        File archivo = null;
        FileReader fr = null;
        BufferedReader br = null;

        try {
            archivo = new File ("ReadFile.java");
            fr = new FileReader (archivo);
            br = new BufferedReader(fr);
            // normally I would prefer to use an ArrayList, but JList
            // has a constructor that takes a Vector directly.
            Vector<String> lines = new Vector<String>();

            String line;
            while((line=br.readLine())!=null) {
                System.out.println(line);
                lines.add(line);
            }

            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, new JScrollPane(new JList(lines)));
        } catch(Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            try{
                if( null != fr ) {
                    fr.close();
                }
            } catch (Exception e2) {
                e2.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

Screen shot

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Andrew! You rock! I was looking for that and I couldn't figure it out. Do you know if there's some way so that if I have in my TXT file some kind of format... Like for example: Name: John - Age: 28 Name: Rose - Age: 25 It'd be difficult to load the data, like: John 28 Rose 25 ? – mandy May 8 '11 at 21:32
    
@mandy: It actually sounds as though this data might be better presented in a JTable. As to getting the data in the form needed for a table model, I'd need to know further details of the exact format of the file. Can you edit your question and post an example file? Can we expect all names are a single String? E.G. there are no John Smith's or Rose Van Der Ven's? – Andrew Thompson May 8 '11 at 22:13
    
Vector class is obsolete, you should use ArrayList (or something) instread. – kajacx Mar 27 '13 at 20:23
    
@kajacx You should try using an ArrayList to construct a JList before you say silly things like that. Vector is neither obsolete nor deprecated. – Andrew Thompson Mar 27 '13 at 21:12

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