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I would like to convert an index in a flattened array into a coordinate in a multi-dimension array.

Example: In the following 2-dimension array whose size is [3, 3]:

[
  [ -, -, - ],
  [ *, -, - ],
  [ -, -, - ]
]

the coordinate of * is [0, 1]. If we flatten this array as:

[ -, -, -, *, -, -, -, -, - ]

coordinate (or the index) of * becomes 3. How can we do the opposite? That is, a method like:

index_to_coordinates([3, 3], 3)  # => [0, 1]
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Notice that your index_to_coordinates takes [3, 3] (in addition to the flattened index 3) as an argument, but that is redundant. The information you need is that each line in the matrix is of length 3, and that the flattened index is 3.

3.divmod(3).reverse # => [0, 1]

divmod gives you a pair the quotient and the remainder. Since you are expecting the order: x-coordinate (remainder) then y-coordinate (quotient), you need reverse to flip the order.

Edited according to change in the question

Note: I assume ruby 1.9 in the following. I do not want to bother with ruby 1.8. If necessary, please translate it to ruby 1.8 on your own. It should be easy.

Suppose you have a structure:

[
  [
    [0, 1, 2, 3]
    [4, 5, 6, 7]
    [8, 9, 10, 11]
  ]
  [
    [12, 13, 14, 15]
    [16, 17, 18, 19]
    [20, 21, 22, 23]
  ]
]

so that the size of this structure is represented as [2, 3, 4]. In general, we can express the size as an array sizes. You can convert this into an array flattened that represents the size of each dimension when the whole structure is flattened upto that dimension:

flattened = sizes.dup.drop(1)
(1...flattened.length).reverse_each{|i| flattened[i-1] *= flattened[i]}

With the particular example:

flattened # => [12, 4]

This means that the largest cycle is 12, the next is 4. Suppose you want the coordinate of 7. In order to get that, you do:

index = 7
coordinate = flattened.each_with_object([]) do |size, array|
  quotient, index = index.divmod(size)
  array.push(quotient)
end
coordinate.push(index)

This will give you:

coordinate # => [0, 1, 3]
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Wow, impressive! Thank you Sawa. However, if the matrix gets more then 2 dimensions, this method don't seem to work. –  Zag zag.. May 8 '11 at 23:14
    
@Zag can you add examples of higher-dimension matrices (or tensors)? –  sawa May 8 '11 at 23:19
    
An example of 3 dimensions matrix, NArray.object(2,3,2): [ [ [ nil, nil ], [ nil, nil ], [ nil, nil ] ], [ [ nil, nil ], [ nil, nil ], [ nil, nil ] ] ] –  Zag zag.. May 9 '11 at 6:34
    
Many thanks, Sawa. Your solution is just awesome. I'm currently trying to understand it :) I think I'll also trying to find a general mathematical rule for this. It's strange that NArray (which is a so powerful lib) don't provide a method for this, while it provide the opposite (if I have a 3x3 matrix named 'a', I can get the element number 3 using directy a[3], or of course a[0,1], as given in this cheat sheets: narray.rubyforge.org/SPEC.en). –  Zag zag.. May 9 '11 at 20:13
    
@Zag Good to know my answer is accepted. –  sawa May 9 '11 at 20:58
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