Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the best way to vertically center the content of a div when the height of the content is variable. In my particular case, the height of the container div is fixed, but it would be great if there were a solution that would work in cases where the container has a variable height as well. Also, I would love a solution with no, or very little use of CSS hacks and/or non-semantic markup.

alt text

share|improve this question
    
the method in that article falls apart in Safari (4.0.5) :S –  user349440 May 24 '10 at 23:38
    
Duplicated: stackoverflow.com/questions/396145/… –  ripper234 Jan 3 '12 at 9:02
4  
@ripper234 Not exactly, as this question is about variable height div –  Rauli Rajande Sep 29 '13 at 0:01
2  
Also, this question was asked first. –  Gui Imamura May 2 at 19:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 56 down vote accepted

This seems to be the best solution I’ve found to this problem, as long as your browser supports the :before pseudo element: CSS-Tricks: Centering in the Unknown.

It doesn’t require any extra markup and seems to work extremely well. I couldn’t use the display: table method because table elements don’t obey the max-height property.

HTML

<div class="block">
    <div class="centered">
        <h1>Some text</h1>
        <p>But he stole up to us again, and suddenly clapping his hand on my
           shoulder, said&mdash;"Did ye see anything looking like men going
           towards that ship a while ago?"</p>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

.block {
  height: 300px;
  text-align: center;
  background: #c0c0c0;
  border: #a0a0a0 solid 1px;
  margin: 20px;
}

.block:before {
  content: '';
  display: inline-block;
  height: 100%; 
  vertical-align: middle;
  margin-right: -0.25em; /* Adjusts for spacing */

  /* For visualization 
  background: #808080; width: 5px;
  */
}

.centered {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  width: 300px;
  padding: 10px 15px;
  border: #a0a0a0 solid 1px;
  background: #f5f5f5;
}

Direct link to CodePen - http://codepen.io/chriscoyier/pen/gsodI

share|improve this answer
1  
Now -that- is a -BRILLIANT- solution. Thanks so much for posting this! –  Troy Alford Oct 25 '12 at 19:42
    
As with the other answer, this one would be much better if it described the approach and included code from the link. –  KatieK Jul 23 '13 at 19:30
1  
+1, This solution is really quite ingenious! Btw you could add .block { white-space: nowrap; font-size: 0; line-height: 0; } and leave the negative right margin on the pseudo element, you just have to reset fs and lh on .centered... like this you ensure that the element will be correctly positioned even if it's wider than the viewport (and don't have to use the imo a bit messy negative margin). –  Simon Aug 16 '13 at 10:26
    
@jessegavin - in your opinion ... how does the following stack up against the approach you've outlined: stackoverflow.com/questions/396145/… –  pulkitsinghal Aug 20 '13 at 20:37
1  
Also, this breaks down when the outer container .block has min-height instead of height. –  Lincoln B Jul 30 at 16:04

This is something I have needed to do many times and a consistent solution still requires you add a little non-semantic markup and some browser specific hacks. When we get browser support for css 3 you'll get your vertical centering without sinning.

For a better explanation of the technique you can look the article I adapted it from, but basically it involves adding an extra element and applying different styles in IE and browsers that support position:table\table-cell on non-table elements.

<div class="valign-outer">
    <div class="valign-middle">
        <div class="valign-inner">
            Excuse me. What did you sleep in your clothes again last night. Really. You're gonna be in the car with her. Hey, not too early I sleep in on Saturday. Oh, McFly, your shoe's untied. Don't be so gullible, McFly. You got the place fixed up nice, McFly. I have you're car towed all the way to your house and all you've got for me is light beer. What are you looking at, butthead. Say hi to your mom for me.
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

<style>
    /* Non-structural styling */
    .valign-outer { height: 400px; border: 1px solid red; }
    .valign-inner { border: 1px solid blue; }
</style>

<!--[if lte IE 7]>
<style>
    /* For IE7 and earlier */
    .valign-outer { position: relative; overflow: hidden; }
    .valign-middle { position: absolute; top: 50%; }
    .valign-inner { position: relative; top: -50% }
</style>
<![endif]-->
<!--[if gt IE 7]> -->
<style>
    /* For other browsers */
    .valign-outer { position: static; display: table; overflow: hidden; }
    .valign-middle { position: static; display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; }
</style>

There are many ways (hacks) to apply styles in specific sets of browsers. I used conditional comments but look at the article linked above to see two other techniques.

Note: There are simple ways to get vertical centering if you know some heights in advance, if you are trying to center a single line of text, or in several other cases. If you have more details then throw them in because there may be a method that doesn't require browser hacks or non-semantic markup.

Update: We are beginning to get better browser support for CSS3, bringing both flex-box and transforms as alternative methods for getting vertical centering (among other effects). See this other question for more information about modern methods, but keep in mind that browser support is still sketchy for CSS3.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I found that article today and haven't been able to make it work for my particular situation. Perhaps I need to look into that further. –  jessegavin Sep 12 '08 at 15:39
    
Perhaps you can post the code you are using that doesn't work? –  Chris Marasti-Georg Sep 12 '08 at 15:40
3  
Nope, I am wrong. That method totally works! –  jessegavin Sep 12 '08 at 16:02
    
Is this still the best solution for this problem? –  ripper234 Jan 3 '12 at 8:59
    
That article doesn't seem to work on Chrome 23, Firefox 16 and IE 9. This answer seems to be a better solution. –  Fernando Correia Nov 18 '12 at 21:24

Using the child selector, I've taken Fadi's incredible answer above and boiled it down to just one CSS rule that I can apply. Now all I have to do is add the contentCentered class name to elements I want to center:

HTML

<div class="contentCentered">
    <div>
        <h1>Some text</h1>
        <p>But he stole up to us again, and suddenly clapping his hand on my
           shoulder, said&mdash;"Did ye see anything looking like men going
           towards that ship a while ago?"</p>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

.contentCentered {
  text-align: center;
}

.contentCentered:before {
  content: '';
  display: inline-block;
  height: 100%; 
  vertical-align: middle;
  margin-right: -0.25em; /* Adjusts for spacing */
}

.contentCentered > * {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

Forked CodePen: http://codepen.io/dougli/pen/Eeysg

share|improve this answer
    
Cool. Thanks for sharing. One note of caution is that the * selector is going to perform worse than the accepted answer. Might not be an issue, but worth noting. stevesouders.com/blog/2009/06/18/simplifying-css-selectors –  jessegavin Dec 6 '13 at 22:12
    
Thanks. Yeah, it'll probably perform worse, but nowadays CSS rules probably don't affect things much. We can probably improve this by selecting on > div instead. calendar.perfplanet.com/2011/… –  dougli Dec 13 '13 at 22:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.