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I need help setting up my MySQL Database.

I would like the database to have a table called accounts. All user accounts would be kept in that database. The user account would have the keys:

  • First Name
  • Last Name
  • Email Address
  • Username
  • Password
  • Date of Last Login.

I would really appreciate it if you could tell me what the schema should look like for it.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
CREATE TABLE  `MyDatabase`.`accounts` (
`id` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY ,
`FirstName` VARCHAR( 32 ) NOT NULL ,
`LastName` VARCHAR( 32 ) NOT NULL ,
`Email` VARCHAR( 64 ) NOT NULL ,
`Username` VARCHAR( 32 ) NOT NULL ,
`Password` CHAR( 32 ) NOT NULL ,
`LastLoginDate` DATE NOT NULL
)

This assumes you're using an MD5 hashed password (which is 32 in length). Replace MyDatabase with your database name.

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So do you need to create a new table for each user? –  max_ May 8 '11 at 23:34
1  
No to add a user you would use the MySQL "INSERT INTO" syntax. Like: INSERT INTO accounts (FirstName, LastName, Email, Username, Password, LastLoginDate) VALUES ("John", "Smith", "Jsmith@gmail.com", "jsmith", "jsmithpasswordhash", "date") –  Doug May 8 '11 at 23:35
    
Brilliant, thanks. One more thing for you, could you tell me how I could change the collation of the newly created table to UTF-8? –  max_ May 8 '11 at 23:39
1  
ALTER TABLE accounts CHARACTER SET utf8 –  Doug May 8 '11 at 23:41

I think you mean user account would have these columns. Certainly they aren't all candidate keys.

No account ID? Wouldn't that be the best unique primary key?

I can see where the columns you proposed would belong in a user/customer table; username and password (encrypted and salted, of course) would be in a credential table. I wouldn't have any of these in an account table. I'd have a foreign key pointing to the user that owned the account.

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