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Given this Python class, implementing a Django form, how would you properly break this to meet the PEP8 standards?

class MyForm(forms.Form):
    categories = forms.CharField(required=False,
                                 widget=forms.SelectMultiple(choices=CATEGORY_VALUE),                                               
                                 label="Categories")
    additional_item_ship_cost = forms.CharField(required=False, max_length=10,                                                      
                                                label="Additional Item Ship Cost")

Specifically, the widget= and label= parameters violate the PEP8 rules for line length.

What comes to mind immediately is that I could define the widget and label outside of the class and then use them in the class definition, but that feels very un-pythonic.

share|improve this question
    
blah_blah_cost is a Charfield? –  John Machin May 9 '11 at 0:58
    
Yes - that's part of a business rule - it's used for display. I know it sounds odd, but that's not really relevant for the question I asked. –  Robert Roland May 9 '11 at 2:05
    
PEP 8 doesn't say, for better or worse. If you want to follow it dogmatically, though, you could use "explaining" variables for the overly long parameters. (Though this seems somewhat silly for the string constant.) –  Ian B. May 9 '11 at 2:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I don't think PEP8 says much about it, but I would simply go with double indentation for the parameters:

class MyForm(forms.Form):
    categories = forms.CharField(
            required=False,
            widget=forms.SelectMultiple(choices=CATEGORY_VALUE),
            label="Categories"
        )
    additional_item_ship_cost = forms.CharField(
            required=False,
            max_length=10,
            label="Additional Item Ship Cost"
        )
share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense. Thanks for your answer! –  Robert Roland May 9 '11 at 2:05
    
PEP8 does say on this a bit. In short, everything is more or less like in this answer, however double (8-space) indentation is not necessary, and closing paren is left on the line after last argument. (IMHO it's fine to have closing paren on the next line if there's a comma after last argument, unless it starts with a scatter operator.) –  Anton Strogonoff Jul 6 '12 at 17:06

I agree with using double (8-column) indentation for continuation lines, since it easily distinguishes continuation from block indentation. I also want the indentation to be independent of the length of the first line; the length will change as the code is maintained, but that should not necessitate changing the continuation lines.

So don't line up continuation lines with anything on the first line; instead, use the same relative indentation for any continuation line.

Backslashes for continuation are problematic (invisible trailing whitespace can change the effect), and fortunately are almost never necessary, since Python automatically continues the statement within open bracketing syntax. Breaking function calls at the open-paren (and dicts at the open-brace, lists at the open-bracket, etc.) is what I reach for first.

So I'd do:

class MyForm(forms.Form):
    categories = forms.CharField(
            required=False,
            widget=forms.SelectMultiple(
                choices=CATEGORY_VALUE),
            label="Categories")
    additional_item_ship_cost = forms.CharField(
            required=False, max_length=10,
            label="Additional Item Ship Cost")
share|improve this answer
    
Give choices=CATEGORY_VALUE), an indention bump since it is a nested argument? Regardless, a clean approach. –  hiwaylon Sep 9 '13 at 19:19

You already know that you can split a line inside parens at a comma. Did you know that you can always use the backslash-newline combination to split lines where you can't otherwise split them?:

class MyForm(forms.Form):
    categories = forms.CharField(required=False,
                                 widget=forms.SelectMultiple(choices=\
                                     CATEGORY_VALUE),                                               
                                 label="Categories")
    additional_item_ship_cost = forms.CharField(required=False, max_length=10,                                                      
                                                label=\
                                                "Additional Item Ship Cost")

In addition, you might not know that Python will concatenate adjacent literal strings, throwing away any whitespace between them, so the above could be rewritten as:

class MyForm(forms.Form):
    categories = forms.CharField(required=False,
                                 widget=forms.SelectMultiple(choices=CATEGORY_VALUE),                                               
                                 label=\
                                     "Categories")
    additional_item_ship_cost = forms.CharField(required=False, max_length=10,                                                      
                                                label="Additional"\
                                                    " Item Ship Cost")

Finally, inside parens, you can split lines at a 'dot' just like you can at a comma, and you can use parens JUST to gain this ability:

class MyForm(forms.Form):
    categories = forms.CharField(required=False,
                                 widget=forms.
                                     SelectMultiple(choices=\
                                     CATEGORY_VALUE),                                               
                                 label="Categories")
    additional_item_ship_cost = (forms.
                                     CharField(required=False, max_length=10,                                                      
                                               label="Additional "\
                                                   "Item Ship Cost"))

Combine all of these with judicious de-indenting of subsequent split lines, and you should be able to avoid exceeding an 80-character line.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your excellent response - it's too bad I can't mark two replies as answers. –  Robert Roland May 10 '11 at 17:13
2  
−1. Using backslash to escape line-breaks is prone to invisible-trailing-whitespace errors. And by not breaking at the open-paren, your continuation lines are indented a huge amount, and that amount is needlessly coupled to the length of the first line. Much better to break at the open paren, indent a standard amount (8 or 4 columns), line up all the parameters at that indentation, and not use backslash continuation at all. –  bignose Jun 22 '13 at 0:25

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