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I just realized I added a value to the list of "must-handle" values in my enum, but I didn't catch it until runtime. I know the C# compiler is really powerful when it comes to reflection and introspection of types, so I was wondering if there was a way to force a switch/case statement to cover all possible enum values?

Example:

enum Colors
{
   Red,
   Blue,
   Green,
   Yellow
};

Colors c = ...;

switch (c)
{
   case Colors.Red:  // no error, Red is a Color
      break;
   case Colors.Blue:
   case Colors.Green:  // no error, Blue and Green handled as well
      break;
}  // whoops! "error: 'Colors.Yellow' unhandled"
   // or even, "error: no 'default' and 'Colors.Yellow' unhandled"

Edit: I guess I should have specified I wanted a compile-time solution.

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One of the approaches I can think of is creating an abstract class with behavior implementation specific to each of the enum values. Though this will increase number of classes, it will ensure that implementation is not missed out for an enum value. Let me know if you need some code sample. –  Sandeep G B May 9 '11 at 4:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just throwing ( pun unintended ) this out - You can replace the Switch-Case with a dictionary ( Func<int,int> as an example ):

        Dictionary<Colors,Func<int,int>> d = new Dictionary<Colors, Func<int, int>>();
        d.Add(Colors.Red, (x) => x+1);
        d.Add(Colors.Blue, (x) => x+1);
        d.Add(Colors.Green, (x) => x+1);
        foreach (Colors color in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Colors)))
        {
            if(!d.ContainsKey(color))
            {
                throw new Exception("Poor color " + color + " ignored");
            }
        }
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@maojlds, +1 for the answer. @mos, If the function is not simple as represented, it is better to refactor your code to use OOP principles (inheritence & DPs) –  Sandeep G B May 9 '11 at 4:59
    
@Splendor: if there were a way, I would have done so. In the end, I would still have to deal with the runtime catching an unimplemented enum value. –  moswald May 9 '11 at 14:57

No there's no compile-time way to make that happen. However the very VERY simple answer is to have a default handler which simply throws an exception along the lines of, "this option wasn't handled, boo".

switch (c)
{
    case Colors.Red:  // no error, Red is a Color
        break;
    case Colors.Blue:
    case Colors.Green:  // no error, Blue and Green handled as well
        break;
    default:
        throw new Exception("Unhandled option: " + c.ToString());
}
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5  
But this turns static verification into run-time failure. –  Carlo V. Dango May 18 '14 at 9:49

You can use a meta-method that checks at runtime, but at least checks the whole switch.

https://github.com/faisalmansoor/MiscUtil/blob/master/EnumSwitch/EnumSwitch.cs

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For C++ you can get the compiler to issue a warning by adding the compiler switch /we4061 to your project settings. Hope this helps. :)

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/thxezb7y.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/96f5t7fy(v=vs.80).aspx

Actually I was mistaken about this; it appears you can have the compiler throw an error. Just compile with /Wall /we4061. I haven't tried this myself, but from reading the above MSDN pages, it looks like this should work.

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The links you provided refer to the C/C++ compiler –  Johann Blais May 9 '11 at 5:02
    
This is basically what I'm looking for... ...only for C#. :) –  moswald May 9 '11 at 14:54

You could throw an exception early on if the enum size. Hopefully allerting you very early on when a change to the enum has been made:

enum MyEnum {A, B};

class TestEnum
{
    // static constructor
    static TestEnum()
    {
        // check if this code needs updating as the enum has changed
        if (Enum.GetNames(typeof(MyEnum)).Length != 2)
        {
            // if this fails update myFunction and the number above
            throw new Exception("Internal error - code inconsistency");
        }
    }

    // my function that switches on the enum
    string myFunction(MyEnum myEnum)
    {
        switch (myEnum)
        {
            case MyEnum.A: return "A";
            case MyEnum.B: return "B";
        }
        throw new Exception("Internal error - missing case");
    }
}

This will throw an exception the from the static constructor if the number of items in the enum is changed. So the developer knows he needs to update the code. You could even do this check from a Unit Test that you run with your build.

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