Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a total newbie. Can somebody tell me how to remove an html element using the original javascript not jQuery.

index.html

<html>
<head>
 <script type="text/javascript" src="myscripts.js" > </script>
 <style>
 #dummy {
  min-width: 200px;
  min-height: 200px;
  max-width: 200px;
  max-height: 200px;
  background-color: #fff000;
 }
 </style>
</head>
<body>
 <div id="dummy"></div>

 <form>
  <input type="submit" value="Remove DUMMY" onclick="removeDummy(); "/>
 </form>
</body>

myscripts.js

function removeDummy() {
 var elem = document.getElementById('dummy');
 elem.parentNode.removeChild(elem);
}

What happens when I click the submit button it will disappear for a very very short time and appears back immediately. I want to completely remove the element when I click the button.

share|improve this question
    
What if I click it, spot an error and press stop ? –  alex May 9 '11 at 6:09

7 Answers 7

up vote 64 down vote accepted

What's happening is that the form is getting submitted, and so the page is being refreshed (with its original content). You're handling the click event on a submit button.

If you want to remove the element and not submit the form, handle the submit event on the form instead, and return false from your handler:

HTML:

<form  onsubmit="return removeDummy(); ">
    <input type="submit" value="Remove DUMMY"/>
</form>

JavaScript:

function removeDummy() {
    var elem = document.getElementById('dummy');
    elem.parentNode.removeChild(elem);
    return false;
}

But you don't need (or want) a form for that at all, not if its sole purpose is to remove the dummy div. Instead:

HTML:

<input type="button" value="Remove DUMMY" onclick="removeDummy()" />

JavaScript:

function removeDummy() {
    var elem = document.getElementById('dummy');
    elem.parentNode.removeChild(elem);
    return false;
}

However, that style of setting up event handlers is old-fashioned. You seem to have good instincts in that your JavaScript code is in its own file and such. The next step is to take it further and avoid using onXYZ attributes for hooking up event handlers. Instead, in your JavaScript, you can hook them up with the newer (circa year 2000) way instead:

HTML:

<input id='btnRemoveDummy' type="button" value="Remove DUMMY"/>

JavaScript:

function removeDummy() {
    var elem = document.getElementById('dummy');
    elem.parentNode.removeChild(elem);
    return false;
}
function pageInit() {
    // Hook up the "remove dummy" button
    var btn = document.getElementById('btnRemoveDummy');
    if (btn.addEventListener) {
        // DOM2 standard
        btn.addEventListener('click', removeDummy, false);
    }
    else if (btn.attachEvent) {
        // IE (IE9 finally supports the above, though)
        btn.attachEvent('onclick', removeDummy);
    }
    else {
        // Really old or non-standard browser, try DOM0
        btn.onclick = removeDummy;
    }
}

...then call pageInit(); from a script tag at the very end of your page body (just before the closing </body> tag), or from within the window load event, though that happens very late in the page load cycle and so usually isn't good for hooking up event handlers (it happens after all images have finally loaded, for instance).

Note that I've had to put in some handling to deal with browser differences. You'll probably want a function for hooking up events so you don't have to repeat that logic every time. Or consider using a library like jQuery, Prototype, YUI, Closure, or any of several others to smooth over those browser differences for you. It's very important to understand the underlying stuff going on, both in terms of JavaScript fundamentals and DOM fundamentals, but libraries deal with a lot of inconsistencies, and also provide a lot of handy utilities — like a means of hooking up event handlers that deals with browser differences. Most of them also provide a way to set up a function (like pageInit) to run as soon as the DOM is ready to be manipulated, long before window load fires.

share|improve this answer
    
How to do that? I am a complete noob. Pls... –  Newbie Coder May 9 '11 at 6:10
    
What am I suppose to do then? Pls help... –  Newbie Coder May 9 '11 at 6:11
    
@Newbie: Updated, sorry for my earlier misunderstanding. –  T.J. Crowder May 9 '11 at 6:12
    
Change it to type="button" or put return false; in your JS function –  Pav May 9 '11 at 6:13
    
@T.J Thanks man... –  Newbie Coder May 9 '11 at 6:17

You should use input type="button" instead of input type="submit".

<form>
  <input type="button" value="Remove DUMMY" onclick="removeDummy(); "/>
 </form>

Checkout Mozilla Developer Center for basic html and javascript resources

share|improve this answer
1  
I changed your link from W3Schools to the Mozilla Developer Center. Have a look at w3fools.com for my reasoning... Apart from that, good answer :) –  Alastair Pitts May 9 '11 at 6:14
2  
@Alastair Pitts - its ok. I just want to point PO to html and js basic tutorials.. –  CoderHawk May 9 '11 at 6:17

It reappears because your submit button reloads the page. The simplest way to prevent this behavior is to add a return false to the onclick like so:

<input type="submit" value="Remove DUMMY" onclick="removeDummy(); return false;" />
share|improve this answer

Your JavaScript is correct. Your button has type="submit" which is causing the page to refresh.

share|improve this answer

Change the input type to "button". As T.J. and Pav said, the form is getting submitted. Your Javascript looks correct, and I commend you for trying it out the non-JQuery way :)

share|improve this answer
    
I think I'll stick to submit because this is just an experimental exercise for my future projects that uses submit so I better get used to it... –  Newbie Coder May 9 '11 at 6:20

Just do this element.remove();

Try it here LOOK

http://jsfiddle.net/4WGRP/

share|improve this answer
1  
Careful with this, as this seems to be a fairly new addition, and does not have full browser support namely IE and FF versions 22 and earlier (red-team-design.com/…). –  dule Sep 18 '13 at 18:45

That is the right code. What is probably happening is your form is submitting, and you see the new page (where the element will exist again).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.