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I am developing with GWT and share a codebase with an Android developer. Some functions we want to share take speciffic arguments like "Drawable" under Android and "Image" under GWT.

Is it possible to use a preprocessor variable as in C++:

#ifdef ANDROID
public void DrawImg(Drawable img);
#elif GWT
public void DrawImg(Image img);
#endif

The solution we are testing is a Generic like this:

interface DrawImgInterf<T extends Object> {
    public void DrawImg(T img);
}

However using a preproccesor variable seems better. Is there such a thing in Java?

share|improve this question
    
You can use the C/C++ preprocessor with your Java sources. –  Laurent Pireyn May 9 '11 at 6:20
    
Note that the extends Object in <T extends Object> is unnecessary (because everything extends Object implicitly) and the syntax public void DrawImg<T img>() is invalid: you probably meant public void DrawImg<T>(T img). –  Jesper May 9 '11 at 8:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, there's nothing like that in normal Java. You could run a preprocessor of course, but that will make it painful to develop the code. (Anything like an IDE which expects the code to be "normal" Java is going to get confused.)

Have you considered using an interface instead, which abstracts out the common operations, and binds to the appropriate real type at execution time? That won't always work (as adding a proxy breaks situations where object identity is important) but in some cases it can be helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
you means like interface DrawImgInterf() {public void DrawImg(Object img);} –  Stefan May 9 '11 at 6:22
    
@Stefan: Yes, that's right. I can't see how generics would really help you to be honest - you wouldn't be able to get at the "Common" members. –  Jon Skeet May 9 '11 at 6:23
    
ok, thanks I'll use generics –  Stefan May 9 '11 at 6:25
    
@Stefan: The actual question was, How? –  Adeel Ansari May 9 '11 at 6:32
    
yeah, but there are no "Preprocessor variables in JAVA" so I have to use generics^^ –  Stefan May 9 '11 at 6:53

No, there are no preprocessor variables in Java.

share|improve this answer
    
so using generics is best? Or should I declare it with Object and then cast it? –  Stefan May 9 '11 at 6:18
    
There are people who have created external pre processor, and you can use e.g. the C pre processor, or another external one, like virtualschool.edu/java+ –  Kaj May 9 '11 at 6:21
    
.. but generics sounds good in your case. –  Kaj May 9 '11 at 6:21
    
ok, thanks I'll use generics –  Stefan May 9 '11 at 6:25

Java+ is a preprocessor which can perform substitution using resource bundles:

public static void 
main(String[] args)
{
  System.out.println({{
The answer,
my dearest, 
is {{computeAnswer()}}.
  }});
}
static String computeAnswer()
{
  return {{my computed answer}};
}
share|improve this answer

for such cases it is the best way to use a preprocessor I used it for my J2ME developments http://code.google.com/p/java-comment-preprocessor/wiki/ExampleOfUsageForJ2ME

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Employing Visitor Pattern here, is making sense to me. For example,

interface ImageVisitor {
    void visit(GWTImage image);
    void visit(AndroidImage image);
}

interface IImage {
    void accept(ImageVisitor visitor);
}

class GWTImage implements IImage {
    ..
    public void accept(ImageVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }
    ..
}

class AndroidImage implements IImage {
    ..
    public void accept(ImageVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }
    ..
}

class GWTImageVisitor implements ImageVisitor {    
    public void visit(GWTImage image) {      
        Image img = image.getImage();
        ..
    }
}

class AndroidImageVisitor implements ImageVisitor {    
    public void visit(AndroidImage image) {      
        Drawable drawable = image.getDrawable();
        ..
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
looks intresting, but the problem here is, that the AndroidImage is declared in an package which is NOT avalible in the GWT enviroment. So implementing it this way makes the project "uncompilabble" beacause it cant find the "*.android" package. –  Stefan May 9 '11 at 6:51
    
How are you dealing with the same problem while using Generics? –  Adeel Ansari May 9 '11 at 6:56
    
I dont have to use the package, because I declare it as "GWTImage" in my code and he as "AndroidImg" in his code. In his code he has the "AndroidImg" and in my code I have to know nothing about it. –  Stefan May 9 '11 at 7:02
    
Similarly, you can forget about AndroidImage and AndroidImageVisitor in your code, and he should do so for GWT* classes. Simple ain't it? Am I missing something? –  Adeel Ansari May 9 '11 at 7:06
    
hmmm... ok, I'll have to think about it. I'm not completly shure how it is done. I'll try it and will tell you at the end of the week, or so. But it looks more complicated than using Generics.... –  Stefan May 9 '11 at 7:19

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