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I'm trying to draw a few simple 3D rectangular prisms, but glBindTexture does not seem to be working properly.

I have N number of "pieces", each with a material name.

I am looping through each piece, finding its texture based on its material name, calling glBindTexture, then drawing the piece. It seems though, if i have multiple pieces with the same material name, only the first is drawn with a texture, and the rest are just white.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Here is the code:

OpenGL initialisation:

static PIXELFORMATDESCRIPTOR pfd =
{
    sizeof(PIXELFORMATDESCRIPTOR),
    1,
    PFD_DRAW_TO_WINDOW | PFD_SUPPORT_OPENGL | PFD_DOUBLEBUFFER,
    PFD_TYPE_RGBA,
    32, // bit depth
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
    16, // z-buffer depth
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
};

GLfloat light_pos1[] = {0.0f, 0.0f, 15.0f, 1.0f};
GLfloat light_ambient[] = {1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f};

// Get device context only once.
hdc = GetDC()->m_hDC;

// Pixel format.
m_nPixelFormat = ChoosePixelFormat(hdc, &pfd);
SetPixelFormat(hdc, m_nPixelFormat, &pfd);

// Create the OpenGL Rendering Context.
hrc = wglCreateContext(hdc);
wglMakeCurrent(hdc, hrc);

//texture
glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);

//Setup:
glClearColor(0.5f, 0.5f, 0.5f, 0.0f);
glClearDepth(1.0f);
glShadeModel(GL_SMOOTH);
glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);
glDepthFunc(GL_LEQUAL);
glHint(GL_PERSPECTIVE_CORRECTION_HINT, GL_NICEST);

//lighting
glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_POSITION, light_pos1);
glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_AMBIENT, light_ambient);
glEnable(GL_LIGHT0);
glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);

// Send draw request
OnDraw(NULL);

texture loading

glGenTextures(1, &texture);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, t.texture);

glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_CLAMP);
glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_CLAMP);

glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);
glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);

gluBuild2DMipmaps(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 3, 256, 256, GL_RGB, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, data);

Then the drawing code:

glPolygonMode(GL_FRONT_AND_BACK, GL_FLAT);

for(int i = 0; i < mPieces.GetCount(); i++)
{
    C3DPiece p = mPieces.GetAt(mPieces.FindIndex(i));

    if(p.visible)
    {
        //GetTextureForMaterial finds the texture id based on the "piece"'s material name
        //have checked this and it is always returning a valid id (>0)

        GLuint tex = GetTextureForMaterial(p.material);

        glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, tex);

        glBegin(GL_QUADS);
        glNormal3f(..., ..., ...);
        glTextCoord2f(..., ...);
        glVertex3F(..., ..., ...);
        glTextCoord2f(..., ...);
        glVertex3F(..., ..., ...);
        glTextCoord2f(..., ...);
        glVertex3F(..., ..., ...);
        glTextCoord2f(..., ...);
        glVertex3F(..., ..., ...);
        glEnd();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I really can't help you without knowing what code makes up the "..." –  Skyler Saleh May 9 '11 at 6:43
    
The ... are just parameters to say how big to draw the pieces. The block between glBegin() and glEnd() is actually repeated 6 times to draw the 6 different faces of the prisms. I omitted the other 5 to make it simpler. –  user744621 May 9 '11 at 8:03
    
Did you check the value of "tex" each loop? Can't think of any other possible issue right now. –  Mario May 9 '11 at 9:05

2 Answers 2

There's no such thing like OpenGL initialization (apart from setting up a context). All what you do to in the "initialization" code either belongs in the render function or texture loading code:

All the following semantically belongs into the render path. OpenGL is a state machine, and like all state machines you put it into a proper start condition before you're doing some job.

//texture
glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);

//Setup:
glClearColor(0.5f, 0.5f, 0.5f, 0.0f);
glClearDepth(1.0f);
glShadeModel(GL_SMOOTH);
glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);
glDepthFunc(GL_LEQUAL);
glHint(GL_PERSPECTIVE_CORRECTION_HINT, GL_NICEST);

//lighting
glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_POSITION, light_pos1);
glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_AMBIENT, light_ambient);
glEnable(GL_LIGHT0);
glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);

In your texture loader you have this:

glGenTextures(1, &texture);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, t.texture);

Either this is a typo, or the generated texture name doesn't make it into 't.' texture.

share|improve this answer
    
I think setting shade model, setting depth function... not really belong into the render path, but into an initialization routine. Although (or because) GL is a state machine, you can assume the states to remain their values if you yourself do not change them. Do not train newbies to configure the whole pipeline everytime they draw an object. –  Christian Rau May 9 '11 at 12:07
    
@Christian: In any modern render path the depth function will be changed quite oftenly. For example if performing an early-Z pass you'll first render the scene to the depth buffer only in glDepthFunc(GL_LESS); then all subsequent render passes are with disabled depth writes and glDepthFunc(GL_EQUAL). Also don't forget that your program may provide some kind of plugin mechanism, or scripted access to OpenGL (just take a look at Blender). In that case plugins/scripts may leave the OpenGL context in a state unknown to your program. The only way to tackle this, is always set the state you need! –  datenwolf May 9 '11 at 13:07
    
@datenwolf That's why I said "if you do not change them" meaning any OpenGL accessing function in your program. Of course you always have to be aware of the parts of your program that change the GL state (including plugins or the like) and I assume in his application he is aware of that. –  Christian Rau May 9 '11 at 13:11
1  
@Christian: And yes I do train newbies to configure the whole pipeline for each render iteration. In the long term it's the only proper way to use OpenGL. As soon as you introduce HUDs, render-to-textures, multipass rendering techniques, etc., you inevitably have to do this anyway. There is little to no benefit in trying to setting certain states in a dedicated initialization phase. –  datenwolf May 9 '11 at 13:25
    
@datenwolf Ok, I see the long-term point in your idea, you're probably right. –  Christian Rau May 9 '11 at 13:48

I think i have fixed it.

Seems there was an actual problem with the texture file (.RAW images) and it was displaying as white instead of the colour/pattern it should have.

I tested again with a smaller amount of materials (3 instead of 3663) and it seems to work OK.

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