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I have a function that does a breadth first search over a big graph. Currently the App runs and is finished after some time. I want to add a finished Event to the EventEmitter.

My first idea was to implement a counter for each Recursive process. But this could fail if some Recursive process does not call the counter-- method.

var App = function(start, cb) {
    var Recursive = function(a, cb) {
       // **asynchronous** and recursive breadth-first search
    }

    var eventEmitter = new EventEmitter();
    cb(eventEmitter);
    Recursive(start); 
};

How can I emit the finished message if all Recursive functions are finished.

Edit App is not searching something in the graph, it has to traversal the complete graph in order to finish. And it is not known how many elements are in the graph.

Edit2 Something like computational reflection would be perfect, but it does not seem to exist in javascript.

The Graph is very unstable and I am doing a few nested asynchronous calls which all could fail. Is there a way to know when all asynchronous recursive calls are finished without using a counter?

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1  
@Atticus: Odd, I don't read it that way. –  T.J. Crowder May 9 '11 at 8:09
1  
The question is really unclear!! Why can't you emit in the last line in your function after Recursive(start) ? –  Amjad Masad May 9 '11 at 12:34
    
After Recursive(start) is called, the App is technically finished. But the Recursive functions are still computing. I want to emit finished after all Recursive functions have finished –  innotune May 9 '11 at 13:13
1  
I'm probably seriously misunderstanding something but in my view firing the event on the line after Recursive(start); means it would only be executed once the function has returned, i.e. after all the recursion has finished. What am I missing? There's no multithreading here... –  JackWilson May 9 '11 at 13:32
1  
If you want some help I suggest you post the Recursive function code either here or if its too big here: gist.github.com –  Amjad Masad May 9 '11 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

JavaScript is single threaded.

So unless Recursive(start); has asynchronous calls in it like setTimeout or ajax it's safe to just trigger your finished event after calling the recursive function.

General asynchronous APIs pass around a done function.

So you would have

Recursive(start, function() {
    // trigger finished.
});

var Recursive = function(a, done) {
    ...
};

And it's upto users to call done when they are done.

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Can you use a boolean outside of the function as a flag and change it's value upon reaching your targetted node? Perhaps your recursive cases can be within a case on the boolean, and when the node is found you can update it's value... Or are you asking what the base case is for your recursive function to complete?

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it is more of a traversal of the complete graph than a searching. i'm asking how to know if all recursive calls in App are finished –  innotune May 9 '11 at 8:16
    
right -- breadth first child -> siblings -> child -> siblings, repeat, right? So i would use a decrementing counter on the number of nodes total, decrementing each visit. Once 0, done, otherwise raise flag that node has been found.. would that work for your search? –  Atticus May 9 '11 at 8:22

Try something like this :

var App = function(start, cb) {
  var pendingRecursive = 0;
  var eventEmitter = new EventEmitter();
  cb(eventEmitter);

  var Recursive = function(a) {
    // breadth-first search recursion

    // before each recursive call:
    pendingRecursive++;
    Recursive(/*whatever*/);

    // at the end of the function
    if (--activeRecursive == 0){
      eventEmitter.emit('end');
    }
  }

  pendingRecursive = 1;
  Recursive(start); 
};

Basically, you just increment a counter before each recursive call, and decrement it at the end of the call, so you're effectively counting the number of unfinished calls, when it's zero, you can then emit your event.

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