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I need to invoke a method on a class using reflection. The class contains two overloads for the same function:

    string GenerateOutput<TModel>(TModel model);
    string GenerateOutput<TModel>(TModel model, string templateName);

I'm getting the method like so:

    Type type = typeof(MySolution.MyType);
    MethodInfo method = typeof(MyClass).GetMethod("GenerateOutput", new Type[] {type ,typeof(string)});
    MethodInfo generic = method.MakeGenericMethod(type);

The method is not fetched (method = null), I guess because the first method parameter is a generic type. How should this be handled?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are two possible issues - finding a method if it is non-public (the example shows non-public), and handling the generics.

IMO, this is the easiest option here:

MethodInfo generic = typeof(MyClass).GetMethods(
        BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
    .Single(x => x.Name == "GenerateOutput" && x.GetParameters().Length == 2)
    .MakeGenericMethod(type);

You could make the Single clause more restrictive if it is ambiguous.

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Yaaaaa it works. Thanks! –  Ropstah May 9 '11 at 8:52

In .NET, when working with generics and reflection, you need to provide how many generic parameters has a class or method like so:

"NameOfMember`N" 

Where "N" is generic parameters' count.

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except that returns null for method –  Marc Gravell May 9 '11 at 8:39
    
Thanks for that point. I've edited it as it could be good enough as an advise for him :) –  Matías Fidemraizer May 9 '11 at 8:45
    
I forgot to say I've removed code sample because as I don't know actual code, I don't want to invent what's behind his problem. –  Matías Fidemraizer May 9 '11 at 8:46
    
Thanks for your effort. Marc's solution however is nicer as I don't like to write IL code. –  Ropstah May 9 '11 at 9:09
    
Are you sure this is about IL? –  Matías Fidemraizer May 9 '11 at 9:10

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