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I am looking for a clean object-orientated way to model the following (in Scala):

A person can be:

  • A manager at some firm
  • A mathematician
  • A world-class tennis player
  • A hobbyist programmer
  • A volunteer at a local school
  • A creative painter

This suggests that we introduce a Person super-class and sub-classes:

  • class Manager
  • class Mathematician
  • class TennisPlayer
  • class HobbyistProgrammer
  • class Volunteer
  • class Painter

The Manager class has methods such as: getSalary(), workLongHours(), findNewJob(), etc. The TennisPlayer class has methods such as: getWorldRanking(), playGame(), strainAnkle(), etc. And so on. In addition there are methods in class Person such as becomeSick(). A sick manager loses his job and tennis player stops playing in the season.

Futhermore the classes are immutable. That is, for instance strainAnkle() returns a new TennisPlayer that that has a strained ankle, but where all other properties remain the same.

The question is now: How do we model the fact that a person can be both a Manager and a TennisPlayer?

It's important that the solution preserves both immutability and type-safety.

We could implement classes such as:

  • ManagerAndMathematician
  • ManagerAndTennisPlayerAndPainter
  • ManagerAndPainter

but this leads to a combinatorial explosion of classes.

We could also use traits (with state), but then how do we implement methods such as findNewJob(), which needs to return a new person with the same traits mixed in, but with a new state of the Manager trait. Similarly, how can we implement methods such as becomeSick()?

Question: How would you implement this in a clean OO-fashion in Scala? Remember: Immutability and type-safety are a must.

share|improve this question
    
"A sick manager loses his job" Frightening... No social security on your country? –  PhiLho May 9 '11 at 9:04
    
Actually there is plenty, let's just say he goes on sick leave then :) –  Magnus Madsen May 9 '11 at 9:05
2  
check out this paper by odersky mp.binaervarianz.de/icsoft2008.pdf. it might just have what you need. –  Walter Chang May 9 '11 at 9:37
    
@chang Please add the title, so we don't have to click on the link just to find out that we have already read this paper. –  ziggystar May 9 '11 at 11:14
    
The paper talks about role and collaboration orientated programming. It seems to strike close to what I wish to achieve, but there are some problems. –  Magnus Madsen May 10 '11 at 14:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This does not look to me like an ideal case for inheritance. Maybe you're trying to force things into an inheritance pattern because it seems awkward to handle composition with immutable values. Here's one of several ways to do it.

object Example {
  abstract class Person(val name: String) {
    def occupation: Occupation
    implicit val self = this
    abstract class Occupation(implicit val practitioner: Person) {
       def title: String
       def advanceCareer: Person
    }
    class Programmer extends Occupation {
      def title = "Code Monkey"
      def advanceCareer = practitioner
    }
    class Student extends Occupation {
      def title = "Undecided"
      def advanceCareer = new Person(practitioner.name) {
        def occupation = new Programmer
      }
    }
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val p = new Person("John Doe") { def occupation = new Student }
    val q = p.occupation.advanceCareer
    val r = q.occupation.advanceCareer
    println(p.name + " is a " + p.occupation.title)
    println(q.name + " is a " + q.occupation.title)
    println(r.name + " is a " + r.occupation.title)
    println("I am myself: " + (r eq r.occupation.practitioner))
  }
}

Let's try it out:

scala> Example.main(Array())
John Doe is a Undecided
John Doe is a Code Monkey
John Doe is a Code Monkey
I am myself: true

So this works in a somewhat useful way.

The trick here is that you create anonymous subclasses of your person each time an occupation (which is an inner class) decides to change things up. Its job is to create a new person with the new roles intact; this is helped out by the implicit val self = this and the implicit constructor on Occupation which helpfully automatically loads the correct instance of the person.

You will probably want a list of occupations, and thus will probably want helper methods that will regenerate the list of professions. Something like

object Example {
  abstract class Person(val name: String) {
    def occupations: List[Occupation]
    implicit val self = this
    def withOccupations(others: List[Person#Occupation]) = new Person(self.name) {
      def occupations = others.collect {
        case p: Person#Programmer => new Programmer
        case s: Person#Pirate => new Pirate
      }
    }
    abstract class Occupation(implicit val practitioner: Person) {
       def title: String
       def addCareer: Person
       override def toString = title
    }
    class Programmer extends Occupation {
      def title = "Code Monkey"
      def addCareer: Person = withOccupations( this :: self.occupations )
    }
    class Pirate extends Occupation {
      def title = "Sea Monkey"
      def addCareer: Person = withOccupations( this :: self.occupations )
    }
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val p = new Person("John Doe") { def occupations = Nil }
    val q = (new p.Programmer).addCareer
    val r = (new q.Pirate).addCareer
    println(p.name + " has jobs " + p.occupations)
    println(q.name + " has jobs " + q.occupations)
    println(r.name + " has jobs " + r.occupations)
    println("I am myself: " + (r eq r.occupations.head.practitioner))
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems like a promising approach. I need to look into it some more, but on the top of my head: How would you implement say Person.retire() which removes Programmer, but not Pirate from the list of occupations? Second, how would you implement Person.getSalary (let's just say that a Programmer is the only one who has a salary.) –  Magnus Madsen May 10 '11 at 14:41
    
I'd probably add a dropCareer method that called withOccupations(self.occupations.flatMap { case p: Programmer => None; case _ => Some(p) }), and if I didn't want to have Occupation define salary: Option[Double] = None by default and have that overridden, I'd have a WageEarner trait mixed in that had a salary: Double trait (overridden with a value when creating the profession, I suppose). Then the person gets the salary using occupations.flatMap(_.salary).sum or occupations.collect{ case w: WageEarner => w.salary }.sum, depending on the method. –  Rex Kerr May 10 '11 at 15:31

A clean object-oriented way of solving this does not have to be Scala-specific. One could adhere to the general object-oriented design principle of favoring composition over inheritance and use something like Strategy pattern, which is a standard way of avoiding class explosion.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but unfortunately this would require that a person has fields such as manager, tennisPlayer, etc. etc. and many of these would be null. –  Magnus Madsen May 10 '11 at 14:20
    
@magnus-madsen Well, not quite. Going along the lines of Strategy pattern in this case would imply creating a class named, say, Role and subclassing it with Manager, TennisPlayer, etc. The class Person then would hold a list of roles. To satisfy your other requirements, you could put a reference to the person into every role and even implement some interaction logic between roles if needed. –  Oleg Mirzov May 10 '11 at 20:08

I think this can be solved in a manner similar to type-safe builders.

The basic idea is to represent "state" through type parameters, and use implicits to control methods. For example:

sealed trait TBoolean
final class TTrue extends TBoolean
final class TFalse extends TBoolean

class Person[IsManager <: TBoolean, IsTennisPlayer <: TBoolean, IsSick <: TBoolean] private (val name: String) {
  // Factories
  def becomeSick = new Person[TFalse, IsTennisPlayer, TTrue](name)
  def getBetter = new Person[IsManager, IsTennisPlayer, TFalse](name)
  def getManagerJob(initialSalary: Int)(implicit restriction: IsSick =:= TFalse) = new Person[TTrue, IsTennisPlayer, IsSick](name) {
    protected override val salary = initialSalary
  }
  def learnTennis = new Person[IsManager, TTrue, IsSick](name)

  // Other methods
  def playGame(implicit restriction: IsTennisPlayer =:= TTrue) { println("Playing game") } 
  def playSeason(implicit restriction1: IsSick =:= TFalse, restriction2: IsTennisPlayer =:= TTrue) { println("Playing season") }
  def getSalary(implicit restriction: IsManager =:= TTrue) = salary

  // Other stuff
  protected val salary = 0
}

object Person {
  def apply(name: String) = new Person[TFalse, TFalse, TFalse](name)
}

It can get very wordy, and if things get complex enough, you may need something like an HList. Here's another implementation, that separates concerns better:

class Person[IsManager <: TBoolean, IsTennisPlayer <: TBoolean, IsSick <: TBoolean] private (val name: String) {
  // Factories
  def becomeSick = new Person[TFalse, IsTennisPlayer, TTrue](name)
  def getBetter = new Person[IsManager, IsTennisPlayer, TFalse](name)
  def getManagerJob(initialSalary: Int)(implicit restriction: IsSick =:= TFalse) = new Person[TTrue, IsTennisPlayer, IsSick](name) {
      protected override val salary = initialSalary
  }
  def learnTennis = new Person[IsManager, TTrue, IsSick](name)

  // Other stuff
  protected val salary = 0
}

object Person {
  def apply(name: String) = new Person[TFalse, TFalse, TFalse](name)

  // Helper types
  type PTennisPlayer[IsSick <: TBoolean] = Person[_, TTrue, IsSick]
  type PManager = Person[TTrue, _, _]

  // Implicit conversions
  implicit def toTennisPlayer[IsSick <: TBoolean](person: PTennisPlayer[IsSick]) = new TennisPlayer[IsSick]
  implicit def toManager(person: PManager) = new Manager(person.salary)
}

class TennisPlayer[IsSick <: TBoolean] {
  def playGame { println("Playing Game") }
  def playSeason(implicit restriction: IsSick =:= TFalse) { println("Playing Season") }
}

class Manager(salary: Int) {
  def getSalary = salary
}

To get better error messages you should use specialized versions of TBoolean (ie, HasManagerJob, PlaysTennis, etc), and the annotation implicitNotFound to go with it.

share|improve this answer
    
Using types as a bitset for all possible human occupations and statuses? Ouch. That can't scale well--you have O(N^2) type annotations required in the code for N occupations. –  Rex Kerr May 9 '11 at 17:18
    
@Rex I'm not sure where you get O(N^2) type annotations. Up there I have 2 annotations for 2 occupations. But, sure, if the set of occupations may be arbitrarily long, then one would have to resort to some kind of HList to handle stuff. –  Daniel C. Sobral May 9 '11 at 19:57
    
If there are N possible occupations, your class takes N type parameters which must be repeated in N implicit conversions. Thus you need O(N^2) entries. –  Rex Kerr May 9 '11 at 20:53
    
@Rex Oh, I see what you mean. But that only applies to the version that uses implicit conversions! The other version has no such limitation. Also, it can be improved even in the version with type parameters, such as I have now done. It's still quadratic, but the use of wild cards keeps it much shorter. –  Daniel C. Sobral May 9 '11 at 23:33
    
@Rex Though now that you mention it, I see the quadratic problem would apply to the constructors, which actually makes that version more verbose. If you have any significant number of such classes, though, you'd be better off with something based on HList, which I think is still suitable to represent such restrictions. –  Daniel C. Sobral May 9 '11 at 23:36

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