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After strictly following the SSL certificate authority documentation, I'm stumped to solve the reason for this error. When accessing my website via HTTPS Firefox spits out the following error:

SSL peer was unable to negotiate an acceptable set of security parameters.
(Error code: ssl_error_handshake_failure_alert)

I went back and found this in the SSL error log (domain was modified on purpose):

[Mon May 09 02:11:05 2011] [warn] RSA server certificate wildcard CommonName (CN) `*.domain.com' does NOT match server name!?

Where is the server name defined? I can't find a reasonable explanation in my httpd-ssl.conf file to solve this error. Thanks for your help!

Update Finally solved the problem, detailed below:

Unfortunately it was created by a default value in my Apache distribution. The option:

SSLVerifyClient require

Actually needed to be set as:

SSLVerifyClient optional

I'm not issuing client certs just yet. However credit is due to the answers for narrowing the problem. I appreciate the help!

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Are you using a self-signed certificate? –  Donal Fellows May 9 '11 at 9:21
    
Yes, I created my own certificate authority to do the job. This is something I'll need for the long-term. –  crockpotveggies May 9 '11 at 9:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That line in your logfile might matter later, but it's only a [warn] and it's not what handshake_failure means. Handshake_failure means that a cipher suite could not be negotiated -- no cipher suite is supported by both client and server. Look at what ciphers are supported by your server.

Edit: I always forget that if a client fails to provide a required certificate, that also results in handshake_failure (section 7.4.6).

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Looking into it now, thanks! –  crockpotveggies May 9 '11 at 10:05
    
Ok finally got it, this was key (no pun intended) to narrowing the issue. I appreciate the help. –  crockpotveggies May 9 '11 at 10:26
1  
In that case you really should accept the answer. Once you gathered a couple of question, the percentage of accepted answers will get displayed next to your username, and if it is to low, people will be reluctant to answer. –  Jens Schauder May 9 '11 at 11:27

SSL compares the CommonName with the name of the server you actually try to connect to.

Possibly you are using an alternative name like 'localhost' or an IP Adress.

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I'm checking it out now thanks! –  crockpotveggies May 9 '11 at 9:25
    
I've done a search and ensured that all server names read "domain.com". Also tried "*.domain.com" and unfortunately it still persists. This was in Apache's httpd.conf files. Anything I'm missing? –  crockpotveggies May 9 '11 at 9:33
    
I'm not .domain.com doesn't sound like a legal domain name to me. domain.com doesn't match the pattern (if it is to be taken literaly). Can you change the names to www.domain.com or similar? –  Jens Schauder May 9 '11 at 9:35
    
yep servername changed to www.domain.com with no connection. however, SSL did not log the error this time. it's now just refusing a handshake. are there any special values Apache needs for a certificate authority? thanks! –  crockpotveggies May 9 '11 at 9:49
    
I used Fiddler to decrypt and intercept the traffic. I am updating the question with Fiddler's response. –  crockpotveggies May 9 '11 at 10:00

Solved the problem, and unfortunately it was created by a default value in my Apache distribution. The option:

SSLVerifyClient require

Actually needed to be set as:

SSLVerifyClient optional

I'm not issuing client certs just yet. However credit is due to the answers for narrowing the problem. I appreciate the help!

share|improve this answer

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