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I am writing a function which accepts a Button object and should set onclick client script which conditionally calls the existing client script. For example, if I start with a button which would render like:

<input type="button" value="ok" id="ok"
  onclick="existingClickHandler(this);"
  />

I want to programmatically set OnClientClick on this button so it would render something like:

<input type="button" value="ok" id="ok"
  onclick="Wrapper(function { existingClickHandler(this); });"
  />

The problem is that the existing code uses this, I don't know how to write Wrapper() in such a way that this still points to the correct object.

How can I make the existingClickHandler continue to operate properly when called by Wrapper()?


Update: Per request, the scenario is I am writing an ASP.NET function to disable buttons on click, in order to prevent double-posts, and for some UI responsiveness. In my server-side C# code I have a function (this has been condensed a bit for clarity):

void AutoDisableButtons(Button sourceButton, params Button[] buttonsToDisable)
{
    string oldScript = sourceButton.OnClientClick;
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(oldScript))
        oldScript = "null";
    else
        oldScript = "function(){" + oldScript + ";}";
    postbackEventScript = ....
    buttonsToDisableArrayScript = ....
    sourceButton.OnClientClick = "return DisableButtonsOnSubmit.call(this, " + oldScript + ", " + postbackEventScript + ", " + buttonsToDisableArrayScript + ");";
}

And the corresponding client script:

function DisableButtonsOnSubmit(oldClickScript, postbackEventReference, buttonsToDisableArray)
{
    if((typeof(Page_ClientValidate) == 'function') && !Page_ClientValidate())
        return false;
    if((typeof(oldClickScript) == 'function') && !oldClickScript.call(this))
        return false;
    for (var i=0; i<buttonsToDisableArray.length; i++)
    {
        if(null != document.getElementById(buttonsToDisableArray[i]))
        {
            document.getElementById(buttonsToDisableArray[i]).disabled = true;
        }
    }
    postbackEventReference.call(this);
    return true;
}

Note that this code includes the .call() solution proposed by @herostwist

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think what you want is to pass the button to existingClickHandler and still have this reference a different object within existingClickHandler.

That assumption being true try this:

<input type="button" value="ok" id="ok"
  onclick="existingClickHandler.call(SomeObjectForThis, this);"
/>

Where SomeObjectForThis is the object you want this to reference within existingClickHandler

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if you want to understand what the .call does: odetocode.com/blogs/scott/archive/2007/07/05/… –  herostwist May 9 '11 at 10:32
    
I didn't know about call, but this was exactly what I was looking for. –  tenfour May 9 '11 at 10:32
    
Huh if you're passing this as argument # 1, and not set the context, why not just use onclick="existingClickHandler(this)"? this will be argument # 1 as in your code... –  Rudie May 9 '11 at 10:35
    
@tenfour Could you share with us the actual code you're using now? I'm very curious. Thanks –  Rudie May 9 '11 at 10:36
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If you don't set an object reference 'this' will point to the global window object. The thing is by using the input's onclick in the html tag you loose the ability to do that.

What you want is probably something like this (using jquery)

$('#id').click(function clickHandler(){ // code here });

Once you have done that you have the ability to call your handler in the correct scope

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this should be helpful: http://devlicio.us/blogs/sergio_pereira/archive/2009/02/09/javascript-5-ways-to-call-a-function.aspx

You could use a delegate:

onclick="var me = this; Wrapper(function { existingClickHandler(me); });"
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I cannot modify the existing code, and even so the code needs to run in the right scope. I think @Zachary K is on to something here though so I'm experimenting there. –  tenfour May 9 '11 at 10:25
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You can store 'this' in a variable and use the variable instead:

<input type="button" value="ok" id="ok"
  onclick="var that=this; Wrapper(function { existingClickHandler(that); });"
  />
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