Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a Java programmer, but now I have to write a little bit of code in c++. I learned the basics of C++ a couple of years ago, so I'm not really fit.

I wrote a little class which describes a Polynomial. Here it is:

#include "Polynom.h"
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

Polynom::Polynom()
{
    this->degree = 0;
    this->coeff = new int[0];
}

Polynom::Polynom(int degree)
{
    this->degree = degree;
    this->coeff = new int[degree + 1];
}

Polynom::~Polynom()
{
    delete coeff;
}

void Polynom::setDegree(int degree)
{
    this->degree = degree;
}

void Polynom::setCoeffs(int* coeff)
{
    this->coeff = &*coeff;
}

void Polynom::print()
{
    int i;
    for(i = degree; i >= 0; i --)
    {
        cout<<this->coeff[i];
        if(i != 0)
            cout<<"x^"<<i;
        if(i > 0)
        {
            if(coeff[i - 1] < 0)
                cout<<" - ";
            else
                cout<<" + ";
        }
    }    
}

Okay, now I tried to read the degree and the coefficients of the polynomial and print it in the console. Here's the code for that:

#include <iostream>
#include "Polynom.h"
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int degree;

    cout<<"degree = ";
    cin>>degree;
    int* coeff = new int[degree];
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i <= degree; i++)
    {
        cout<<"coeff[x^"<<i<<"] = ";
        cin>>coeff[i];
    }
    Polynom *poly = new Polynom(degree);
    //poly->setDegree(degree);
    poly->setCoeffs(coeff);
    cout<<"The input polynome is: ";
    poly->print();
    return 0;
}

When compiling the code, everything is ok. When running, if I give an even degree and then give some coefficients, the program runs normally. But: if I define an odd degree (for example 3 or 5) and then give the coefficients, the program does not print the polynome and returns the following error:

malloc.c:3096: sYSMALLOc: Assertion `(old_top == (((mbinptr) (((char *) &((av)->bins[((1) - 1) * 2])) - __builtin_offsetof (struct malloc_chunk, fd)))) && old_size == 0) || ((unsigned long) (old_size) >= (unsigned long)((((__builtin_offsetof (struct malloc_chunk, fd_nextsize))+((2 * (sizeof(size_t))) - 1)) & ~((2 * (sizeof(size_t))) - 1))) && ((old_top)->size & 0x1) && ((unsigned long)old_end & pagemask) == 0)' failed.

Why does this happen? Where didn't I allocate enough memory for the array? I googled for this error and stumbled upon this page, but the solution mentioned there did not help me much.

Maybe you can see another problem in my code? I would really appreciate your help.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Could you post the header file? –  Robert S. Barnes May 9 '11 at 10:33
2  
You should do delete[] coeff in the destructor; or better yet, use an std::vector<int> (which would rid you of the degree member, too). –  Luc Danton May 9 '11 at 10:40
    
Also, delete poly; –  Tamás Szelei May 9 '11 at 10:45
    
@Downvoter - why? Well formatted question, lots of information, poster had made an honest attempt. –  Dennis May 9 '11 at 11:12
add comment

4 Answers

There is a vast amount wrong with your code. C++ is nothing like Java and it seems that you are using pointers as if they are like references in Java, which they emphatically are not.

Polynom::Polynom()
{
    this->degree = 0;
    this->coeff = new int[0];
}

This creates an array of size zero, which is legal in C++, but almost never what you want.

Polynom::~Polynom()
{
    delete coeff;
}

Arrays in C++ must be deleted with delete[]:

Polynom::~Polynom()
{
    delete [] coeff;
}

This:

void Polynom::setDegree(int degree)
{
    this->degree = degree;
}

makes no sense - you change the degree, but not the array it is associated with.

void Polynom::setCoeffs(int* coeff)
{
    this->coeff = &*coeff;
}

I have no idea what you think this is doing, and I suspect you don't either. And you have a memory leak.

That was just for starters - Isuspect there is much more bad stuff. You need to do two things:

  • Read a book on C++. As you have programming experience, I recommend Accelerated C++.

  • Forget about your Java knowledge. As I said, the two languages have almost nothing in common.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for delete[]. –  Naveen May 9 '11 at 10:42
    
this->coeff = &*coeff;... I suspect that what the OP was trying to do was set the internal pointer coeff to a new address? In which case this->coeff = coeff; would do fine. –  Dennis May 9 '11 at 10:43
add comment
int* coeff = new int[degree];
int i;
for(i = 0; i <= degree; i++)

You are allocating space for degree elements and putting there degree+1 elements... The behavior is undefined.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In your main() function, int *coeff = new int[degree] gives you a length-degree array, with element indices ranging from 0 to degree-1, inclusive. In your loop, you are accessing elements 0 to degree, inclusive. This is undefined behaviour, which may or may not cause runtime errors, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for all your replies. It was indeed that damn index. Oh well, I earned the student badge. I'm a C++ newbie, yeeeey. I feel like a couple of years ago, when I started programming. :-) –  Darie May 10 '11 at 17:52
add comment

The statement i <= degree in the for loop is causing it. Since array indexes start from 0 the valid range is 0->degree-1. Since you are writing to an invalid memory location your program is behaving unpredictably.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.