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The next part of the assignment tells me that the Class RacingCar contains four wheel objects as defined by class Wheel. Implement the wheels as an array of objects on the heap.

class RacingCar{
    int speed;

public:
    void Accelerate(int value) {
        speed = speed + value;
    }

    void Brake(int value) {
        speed = speed - value;
    }

    void Turn(int value) {
        speed = value / 4;
    }

    void Print(){
        cout << "The current KM/h of the car is: " << speed;
    }
};

class Wheel {
    int *ptrSize;
    int pressure;

public:
    Wheel() : pressure(32) {
        ptrSize = new int(30);
    }

    Wheel (int s, int p) : pressure(p) {
        ptrSize = new int(s);
    }

    ~Wheel() {
        delete ptrSize;
    }

    void pump(int amount) {
        pressure += amount;
    }

    void print() {
        cout << pressure;
    }
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Wheel *heapArray = new Wheel[4];
    RacingCar F1; //Creating a "Formula 1" test car

    //Test parameters
    F1.Accelerate(10);
    F1.Brake(50);
    F1.Turn(180);
    F1.Print(); //Checks to see if the car changes actually worked

    getch();

    delete [] heapArray; //Delete when you're done
    return 0;
}

Is it ideal to build a class like this, and then access it inside RacingCar? Or is there a better way to do so? I can't see a way to create it on the heap otherwise.

share|improve this question
    
Go to your professor and tell them that "heap" in this context is out-moded and inaccurate. Finish by stabbing them in the face. – Lightness Races in Orbit May 9 '11 at 10:38
    
I seriously want to give you an upvote for this, but alas I cannot – Herp May 9 '11 at 10:39
    
...So, is your professor dead? If you do not reply, I will assume you are either in jail or plotting to destroy this planet. If the latter is the case, contact me, and I will consider including you within my plot. – Mateen Ulhaq Nov 1 '11 at 4:50
    
Replying over two years later here: I am now part of your plot. But no, seriously, the class got disbanded for some way too long winded to explain here reason. Thanks for your help anyway. – Herp May 28 '13 at 6:51
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Implement the wheels as an array of objects on the heap.

Kind of pointless really, but it's an exercise, so ...

the assignment tells me that the Class "RacingCar" contains four wheel objects as defined by class Wheel.

When your assignment says "contains four wheel objects" you can translate this requirement to "the wheel objects should be a member of my class".

I assume your instructor expects you to initialize the wheel-object-array in the ctor of the RacingCar class and then release (delete[]) it in the dtor of the RacingCar class.

Note, however, that the correct way to do this would be:

class Wheel;

class RacingCar {
...
std::vector<Wheel> wheels; // if you need a variable amount of wheels
Wheel wheels[4]; // if you need exactly 4 wheels.
...

Even if you really must allocate the Wheel objects on the heap, you still wouldn't use delete[], but be better served to use a tool such as boost::scoped_array.


Let's flesh this out a bit, since we want complete answers on SO, even for "homework" questions, right?

As mentioned above, modeling containment is usually done via members of a class, although in this case the member of the class will probably be some kind of array.

Given the requirement to allocate Wheel on the heap (while it doesn't make sense for the toy example, there are a lot of legitimate use-cases to have objects of a class allocated on the heap in a member-scenario) -- I'd say the following solutions are Good Style:

  • This gives you an array of exactly 4 heap allocated objects. You will not need to free these explicitly:

    class RacingCar {
    ...
    boost::scoped_array<Wheel> wheels;
    ...
    RacingCar()
    : wheels(new Wheel[4])
    { }
    ...
    
  • This uses 4 separate members, which may make sense in some use cases, where you have members of the same class, but don't use them uniformly:

    class RacingCar {
    ...
    boost::scoped_ptr<Wheel> front_left;
    boost::scoped_ptr<Wheel> front_right;
    boost::scoped_ptr<Wheel> rear_left;
    boost::scoped_ptr<Wheel> rear_right;
    ...
    RacingCar()
    : front_left(new Wheel)
    , front_right(new Wheel)
    , rear_left(new Wheel)
    , rear_right(new Wheel)
    { }
    
  • If you want to use variable size, you'll do:

    class RacingCar {
    ...
    boost::ptr_vector<Wheel> wheels;
    ...
    RacingCar() {
      for(size_t i=0; i<4; ++i) {
        wheels.push_back(new Wheel);
      }
    }
    ...
    
  • And finally, if you don't have boost but plain C++, I'd do: (Oh, and note how in the 1st version of this I forgot to add the copy ctor operator. That's the reason you do not go about messing with raw pointers and delete. You'll always forget sth. ;-)

    class RacingCar {
    ...
    Wheel* wheels;
    ...
    RacingCar()
    : wheels(new Wheel[4])
    { }
    ~RacingCar() {
      delete[] wheels;       
    }
    private:
    // Block copy operations. These would need to be
    // implemented properly for the wheels member.
    RacingCar(RacingCar const&); // no impl.
    RacingCar& operator=(RacingCar const&); // no impl.
    ...
    
share|improve this answer
    
@Martin Wow, thanks for explaining this concisely and clearly. I'm trying to figure out how to transfer the way I have it now as a class, into that constructor. A little hard to get my head around, am getting there though – Herp May 9 '11 at 10:58
    
@Martin Am I missing something here? If I put code such as: 'Wheel[4] wheels;' in, I get an error "Excpected a ';'" – Herp May 9 '11 at 11:31
    
@Herp: I've fixed the typo. It should be Wheel wheels[4]; – Martin Ba May 9 '11 at 11:44
    
The last case needs the copy ctor and copy assignment operator to be either implemented or else blocked. – Steve Jessop May 9 '11 at 12:20
    
+1 for a really thorough answer. – Péter Török May 9 '11 at 12:29

The assignment means that the array of Wheels should be part of class RacingCar, like

class RacingCar {
public:
    ...
private: 
    ...
    Wheel *wheels;

};

and you should allocate it in the constructor, then destroy it in the destructor.

share|improve this answer
    
The way I understand this is in the constructor I create a method instead of a class and reference this, essentially replacing the class I had with a constructor? I'm sorry, I did say I was a network engineer! :-/ Thanks so much for your help – Herp May 9 '11 at 10:51
    
@Herp - To allocate it you must remember that you are allocating an array of memory, and the same with the deletion. See fredosaurus.com/notes-cpp/newdelete/50dynamalloc.html for some explanation. – Dennis May 9 '11 at 11:09

I think it's better to add the "*heapArray" as an attribute of RacingCar and creating the wheels in its constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
heapArray. Not *heapArray. – Lightness Races in Orbit May 9 '11 at 10:39

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