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I have the following code

var test;
     $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "../views/person/controller.php?actor=person&action=checkAge",
        data: "age=" + value,
        success: function(msg){
            console.log(msg);
            test = msg; 
        },
    });
    Validate.fail(test);

Now the test var should give true of false like the console does say. But test var gives me undefined why?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Probably because Validate.fail(test) occurs immediately after the asynchronous call. Remember it is ASYNCHRONOUS, meaning it executes parallel to javascript running on your page.

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Tnx this helped me out i found the solution By doing async: false, to the call property –  DownDown May 9 '11 at 12:01
1  
I am glad you figured this out but I recommend you rethink your solution. I can't say that I understand the aspect of your application but a synchronous ajax call mostly defeats the purpose of Ajax. Cheers. –  maple_shaft May 9 '11 at 12:09
    
Tnx for you tip again. But for this purpose it is really necessary. Ill try avoid this solution in the future :) –  DownDown May 9 '11 at 12:15
    
Thanks for give explanation how ASYNCHRONOUS works. –  GusDeCooL Dec 16 '12 at 17:31
 var test;  <-- (1) This code runs first  
 $.ajax({   <-- (2) Then this runs  
    type: "GET",
    url: "../views/person/controller.php?actor=person&action=checkAge",
    data: "age=" + value,
    success: function(msg){
        console.log(msg); <-- (4) Finally this is run. IF your request is a success 
        test = msg; 
    },
 });
 Validate.fail(test); <-- (3) This runs third  

Look at the order in which the code runs. Your variable is simply not available at that point because it's running when the code is triggered via the callback

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<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
var xm;

  $("#txt").ajaxComplete(function(){
    $('#txt').html(xm);
  });

  $("button").click(function(){

    $.ajax({
      url: 'DBresult_load.php',
      dataType: 'html',
      data: { },                 //you can pass values here
      success: function(result) {xm =result;}
    });
  });


});
</script>
</head>
<body>

<div id="txt"><h2>Let AJAX change this text</h2></div>
<button>Change Content</button>
</body>
</html>

Here is the solution for passing values to variable from Ajax request. Hope this helps.

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What happens when you remove "var" before the term "test" when you declare it?

I'm not sure how the call back function is treated with jQuery , as it is wrapped within a few other extended methods.. But the reason i say leave var out in the declaration of the test variable is that var assigns test to be relative to the scope. If your callback is being treated in a certain way, you may lose the scope where test is defined. You may want to drop the var assignment and leave it as a global variable. Perhaps this will make it visible?

EDIT:: Didn't realize you were referencing the term within a function call after the async request -- i would suggest including the last statement within your callback.

:)

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not at all true –  Atticus May 9 '11 at 11:13
2  
var describes the variable to be relative to the scope.. if you leave it out then it becomes a global variable.. research before you speak ;) –  Atticus May 9 '11 at 11:15
    
bad programming practice.. hah. –  Atticus May 9 '11 at 11:15
    
How is it irrelevant? He said that test is undefined... this would mean it's out of scope.. and var delegates the variable to the current stack... so if you drop the var and make it global on the heap instead, it should then be defined... do you understand variable visibility? ;) –  Atticus May 9 '11 at 11:19
1  
I don't understand your answer. You're correct in saying that if you leave out var it will make it a global, but how does that have any bearing on this question? The problem here is that test isn't instantiated at the point the Validate call is made, this is because it is given a value only when the call back is successful. If you actually instantiate when you declare it, the code will work fine (but the validate will be rendered useless since you're explicitly declaring it) –  JohnP May 9 '11 at 11:32

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