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I'm using phpunit framework and I have a code like this:

public function A() {

 try {

   (...some code...)

   die (json_encode ($data));

 }

 catch (Exception $e) {
   die(false);
 }

}

This function is called via AJAX and I can't replace die with return. The question is: How I can make a unit test with a code like this?

I can't use for this, the asserts.

Thanks.

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migrated from serverfault.com May 9 '11 at 11:14

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Doesn't this question belong to StackOverflow ? –  slubman May 9 '11 at 10:24
    
@slubman, Yes I think it does. I have one vote in to migrated it. If you flag it to be moved it will help get it through faster. –  Caleb May 9 '11 at 10:28
    
@doctore: Please don't edit to add back in things that get edited out due to the style guidelines for this site. Read tinyurl.com/so-hints for some ideas on how to ask questions, but in summary adding thanks in advance in questions is just a distraction from the question; in this community you say thanks by voting and returning the favor by helping others with their questions. –  Caleb May 9 '11 at 10:32
    
There's a lot of "I can't" in this question, but not much in the way of explanation. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 9 '11 at 11:18
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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can't test that...

Sometimes unit testing brings up problems like this (untestable situations). That usually means that the problem is not with the testing, but with your code and its architecture.

Here you shouldn't use the die function (actually you shouldn't use die to return a HTTP response), but echo the json and then let the script finish properly (or return the json and echo it somewhere else).

To test this, you can then capture the output and check it (this is a basic example, there is much better I guess).

Conclusion : the problem is with your code, fix this and then you can try to test it. If you can't, then no testing.

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1  
+1 You put that better than me. "If it's hard to test, it's badly coded." –  Blowski May 9 '11 at 11:25
    
@Blowski : "If it's hard to test, it's badly coded." I love this sentence, this is always a bummer to hear that (i've been in that situation many times), but it's pretty much always true... Good programming is hard ;) –  Matthieu Napoli May 9 '11 at 11:27
    
+1 from me too for give me a new sentence for my signature :D –  superbly May 9 '11 at 11:40
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Why can you not replace die() with a return?

My solution would be to make this throw an exception, and then catch the exception with another method. Then you can unit test function a(), checking that it throws the right kind of exception. The other function handles the die().

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actually die seems to be not a good solution here. but if there is no way to change this you could probably run the function in another process.

for this you have to write a test file which runs the function A. ex.

<?php
include 'fileWithAFunction.php';
A();
?>

now call this script with shell_exec.

$return = shell_exec('testscript.php');

the return variable holds the output of the testscript.

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1  
+1 for pointing out how to do it when you can't change the original code for reasons beyond your control. –  David Harkness May 10 '11 at 1:57
    
You could also do a file_get_contents('http://example.com/testscript.php'). –  dave1010 May 11 '11 at 10:12
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