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I'm having troubles with reading a UTF-8 encoded text file in Hebrew. I read all Hebrew characters successfully, except to two letters = 'מ' and 'א'.

Here is how I read it:

    FileInputStream fstream = new FileInputStream(SCHOOLS_LIST_PATH);
BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in));
String strLine;

// Read File Line By Line
while ((strLine = br.readLine()) != null) {

                if(strLine.contains("zevel")) {

                    continue;
                }

                schools.add(getSchoolFromLine(strLine));
}

Any idea?

Thanks, Tomer

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1  
What are you reading instead of 'מ' and 'א'? –  jarnbjo May 9 '11 at 11:39
    
A square and a question mark for each one of these two letters. Something like - "?ם" –  tomericco May 9 '11 at 15:07
    
Please don't use DataInputStream to read text. Unfortunately examples like this get copied again and again so can you can remove it from your example. vanillajava.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/… –  Peter Lawrey Jan 31 '13 at 0:10
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're using InputStreamReader without specifying the encoding, so it's using the default for your platform - which may well not be UTF-8.

Try:

new InputStreamReader(in, "UTF-8")

Note that it's not obvious why you're using DataInputStream here... just create an InputStreamReader around the FileInputStream.

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1  
Is it really likely that he is using a default encoding which is compatible with UTF-8 except for the characters 'מ' and 'א'? –  jarnbjo May 9 '11 at 11:38
    
@jarnbjo: I don't know, but it's the most obvious starting point, and it's definitely the first step I'd take. –  Jon Skeet May 9 '11 at 12:06
    
Why is that obvious? If he is not using UTF-8 as the default encoding, reading an UTF-8 encoded file with Hebrew characters would produce garbage and not just a few misinterpreted characters. –  jarnbjo May 9 '11 at 12:22
    
@jarnbjo: Not specifying an encoding when he expects a particular one is an obvious bad thing to do, is what I meant. The code would definitely be improved by specifying the charset, and it may fix the problem. –  Jon Skeet May 9 '11 at 12:24
1  
@tomericco: It shouldn't have changed anything. It sounds like your way of diagnosing what's going on may be problematic... and if it's definitely UTF-8, then that's what you should specify. If you load the file in another text editor (not Notepad) specifying UTF-8, does that work? –  Jon Skeet May 10 '11 at 11:03
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