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I'm trying to figure out what i am doing wrong with action listeners. I'm following multiple tutorials and yet netbeans and eclipse are giving me errors when im trying to use an action listener.

Below is a simple program that im trying to get a button working in.

What am i doing wrong?

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;


public class calc extends JFrame implements ActionListener {



    public static void main(String[] args) {

        JFrame calcFrame = new JFrame();

        calcFrame.setSize(100, 100);
        calcFrame.setVisible(true);

        JButton button1 = new JButton("1");
        button1.addActionListener(this);

        calcFrame.add(button1);
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        if(e.getSource() == button1)
    }  

}

the action listener is never registered because with the if(e.getSource() == button1) it cant see button1, errors saying cannot find symbol.

share|improve this question
1  
1) Class names should be EachWordUpperCase. 2) Don't extend frame unless adding functionality. 3) If extending frame, you probably do not also need to instantiate one in the main(String[]) 4) It is generally considered better practice to add one action listener to each GUI element that needs, rather than have one single actionPerformed(ActionEvent) method with an enormous if/else cascade. 5) If you follow the advice at (4), the problem largely vanishes. –  Andrew Thompson May 9 '11 at 12:07
    
Could use actions - best choice for many UI elements doing the same thing with consistency (example tool bar and button) to open. see docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/misc/action.html –  tgkprog Jul 19 '13 at 17:34

8 Answers 8

up vote 14 down vote accepted

There is no this pointer in a static method. (I don't believe this code will even compile.)

You shouldn't be doing these things in a static method like main(); set things up in a constructor. I didn't compile or run this to see if it actually works, but give it a try.

public class Calc extends JFrame implements ActionListener {

    private Button button1;

    public Calc()
    {
        super();
        this.setSize(100, 100);
        this.setVisible(true);

        this.button1 = new JButton("1");
        this.button1.addActionListener(this);
        this.add(button1);
    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Calc calc = new Calc();
        calc.setVisible(true);
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        if(e.getSource() == button1)
    }  

}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, that cleared it right up for me I appreciate the help –  user519670 May 9 '11 at 12:12

I'm amazed that nobody has mentioned using an action command. This is a pretty standard way of associating sources and listeners. Its really useful if;

  • you have multiple event sources that need to do the same thing (eg if you want the use to be able to press the enter key on a text field as an alternative to clicking a button next to it)
  • you don't have a ref to the component generating the event

see;

import java.awt.FlowLayout;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;    
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

public class DontExtendJFrame implements ActionListener {

  private enum Actions {
    HELLO,
    GOODBYE
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {

    DontExtendJFrame instance = new DontExtendJFrame();

    JFrame frame = new JFrame("Test");
    frame.setLayout(new FlowLayout());
    frame.setSize(200, 100);

    JButton hello = new JButton("Hello");
    hello.setActionCommand(Actions.HELLO.name());
    hello.addActionListener(instance);
    frame.add(hello);

    JButton goodbye = new JButton("Goodbye");
    goodbye.setActionCommand(Actions.GOODBYE.name());
    goodbye.addActionListener(instance);
    frame.add(goodbye);

    frame.setVisible(true);
  }

  @Override
  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
    if (evt.getActionCommand() == Actions.HELLO.name()) {
      JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Hello");
    } else if (evt.getActionCommand() == Actions.GOODBYE.name()) {
      JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Goodbye");
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
DontExtendJFrameAndDontImplementXXListenerAtTopLevel :-) –  kleopatra Feb 25 '13 at 12:21
    
Why shouldn't you extend JFrame? I've always been taught to. –  Lucas Apr 17 '13 at 20:03
2  
@Lucas In general, one should favor composition over inheritance. –  Qwerky Apr 18 '13 at 12:02
1  
@Qwerky Okay, now pretend I don't understand what you just said... –  Lucas Apr 18 '13 at 23:31
    
@Lucas see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Composition_over_inheritance , stackoverflow.com/questions/49002/… and my.safaribooksonline.com/book/programming/java/9780137150021/… I recommend buying and reading Effective Java the book in the last link. –  Qwerky Apr 19 '13 at 9:13

Here is a modified form of the source based on my comment. Note that GUIs should be constructed & updated on the EDT, though I did not go that far.

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;
import javax.swing.JFrame;

public class Calc {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        JFrame calcFrame = new JFrame();

        // usually a good idea.
        calcFrame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

        final JButton button1 = new JButton("1");
        button1.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(
                    button1, "..is the loneliest number");
            }
        });

        calcFrame.add(button1);

        // don't do this..
        // calcFrame.setSize(100, 100);

        // important!
        calcFrame.pack();

        calcFrame.setVisible(true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The first problem is that button1 is a local variable of the main method, so the actionPerformed method doesn't have access to it.

The second problem is that the ActionListener interface is implemented by the class calc, but no instance of this class is created in the main method.

The usual way to do what you want is to create an instance of calc and make button1 a field of the calc class.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for your help, this answered alot of questions for me. –  user519670 May 9 '11 at 12:12

The problem is that button1 is a local variable. You could do it by just change the way you add the actionListener.

button.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {  
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
            {
                //button is pressed
                System.out.println("You clicked the button");
            }});

Or you make button1 a global variable.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for your help, this answered alot of questions for me. –  user519670 May 9 '11 at 12:12

You've been told how to sort your immediate problem, but I think there are more important problems here.

  • stick with conventions. Even for throw-away code. That means initial cases for class names.

  • Don't extend classes you don't need to. JFrame should rarely be extended. In fact, you don't create an instance of your derived class!!!

  • Don't bundle a bunch of things into one class. In particular, you should generally only subtype at most one main class or interface at a time (things like Comparable not included).

  • Always interact, including construct, Swing/AWT GUIs on the AWT Event Dispatch Thread (EDT). It's ugly and verbose, but that's Java for you.

  • Checking a source of an event is a bit of hack. Listeners are small, so you can't even claim the lame performance excuse.

So:

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;


public class Calc {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() { public void run() {
            runEDT();
        }});
    }
    private static void runEDT() {
        assert java.awt.EventQueue.isDispatchThread();

        JFrame frame = new JFrame();

        frame.setSize(100, 100);

        JButton button1 = new JButton("1");
        button1.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event) {
                ...
            }
        });

        frame.add(button1);

        frame.setVisible(true);
    }
}

If you need to access any of the variables from the enclosing method within the listener, make them final.

share|improve this answer

You are declaring button1 in main method so you can not access it in actionPerform. You should make it global in class.

 JButton button1;
 public static void main(String[] args) {

    JFrame calcFrame = new JFrame();

    calcFrame.setSize(100, 100);
    calcFrame.setVisible(true);

    button1 = new JButton("1");
    button1.addActionListener(this);

    calcFrame.add(button1);
}

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    if(e.getSource() == button1)
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for your help, this answered alot of questions for me. –  user519670 May 9 '11 at 12:12

First, exend JFrame properly with a super() and a constructor then add actionlisteners to the frame and add the buttons.

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;


public class Calc extends JFrame implements ActionListener {
    JButton button1 = new JButton("1");
    JButton button2 = new JButton("2");

    public Calc()
    {
         setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
         setSize(100, 100);
         button1.addActionListener(this);
         button2.addActionListener(this);
         calcFrame.add(button1);
         calcFrame.add(button2);
    }
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
    {
        Object source = e.getSource();
        if(source == button1)
        {
            \\button1 code here
        } else if(source == button2)
        {
            \\button2 code here
        }
    } 
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {

        JFrame calcFrame = new JFrame();
        calcFrame.setVisible(true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
no (apart from your oversight of not using Calc at all - what you would have noticed had you actually run your example ;-) a) don't extend JFrame, instead use it b) don't implement a xxListener, instead use it –  kleopatra Feb 25 '13 at 12:19

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