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This is the 2nd time I push my code, and it says Everything up-to-date. The repo in GitHub does not reflect any changes.

The first time is when I set up the git repo on github and followed the set up tutorial:

http://help.github.com/create-a-repo/

But this time I modified those files and try to

 git commit -m "msg";
 git add file;
 git push origin master; 

The changes did not reflect on the remote page. anyone know how can I summit the changes to github?

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The first time you did this, git commit would have told you there were no changes to commit. Every subsequent time, you were committing the changes you thought went with the previous commit, since they were left staged (added) then. If you examine your history (e.g. with gitk) you'll see that your changes aren't paired with the commits you thought they were. –  Jefromi May 10 '11 at 3:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You first add a file, then commit and then push.

Do this instead:

git add file;
git commit -m "msg";
git push origin master; 
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You need to add your files before committing, not after.

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I won't repeat already provided answers, but this might of use. If you run git status in your working directory you'll get a summary of the current state of your checkout. No doubt it'll show something along the lines of:

# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git rm --cached <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   new file:   file
#

You can use this information to diagnose exactly what is going on. In our current situation we could gather that nothing has been committed as we've got a file in the Changes to be committed section.

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When you commit, git checks if the file has changed, not it's time stamp. This can be confusing, as your file's time stamp (file mtime) may be younger than the previous commit, and nothing happens.

(like if you type a space, then delete it, then save)

When that happens, make a real change to the file, like adding an empty line, save and commit again.

(Oh, and - obviously - when you "add", you have to "commit" before pushing)

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