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I was trying out different strategies for drawing a graph from the left edge of a control to the right edge. Until now we were using a Canvas with a polyline which performs OK, but could still use some improvement.

When I tried out DrawingContext.DrawLine I experienced incredibly bad performance, and I can't figure out why. This is the most condensed code I can come up with that demonstrates the problem:

public class TestControl : Control {

    static Pen pen = new Pen(Brushes.Gray, 1.0);
    static Random rnd = new Random();

    protected override void OnRender(DrawingContext drawingContext) {

        var previousPoint = new Point(0, 0);

        for (int x = 4; x < this.ActualWidth; x += 4) {
            var newPoint = new Point(x, rnd.Next((int)this.ActualHeight));
            drawingContext.DrawLine(pen, previousPoint, newPoint);
            previousPoint = newPoint;
        }
    }
}

And MainWindow.xaml just contains this:

<StackPanel>
    <l:TestControl Height="16"/>
    <!-- copy+paste the above line a few times -->
</StackPanel>

Now resize the window: depending on the number of TestControls in the StackPanel I experience a noticeable delay (10 controls) or a 30-second-total-standstill (100 controls) where I can't even hit the "Stop Debugger"-Button in VS...

I'm quite confused about this, obviously I am doing something wrong but since the code is so simple I don't see what that could be... I am using .Net4 in case it matters.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can gain performance by freezing the pen.

static TestControl()
{
    pen.Freeze();
}
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Thanks Marat, I just realized that a minute ago :) –  wilford May 10 '11 at 7:32

The most efficient way to draw a graph in WPF is to use DrawingVisual.

Charles Petzold wrote an excellent article explaining how to do it in MSDN Magazine:

Foundations: Writing More Efficient ItmesControls

The techniques work for displaying thousands of data points.

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Thanks, I already know this (very good) article and played around with the source code. In one of the variants he uses DrawingContext.DrawEllipse in a loop with possibly 100000 iterations and it still performs fine. He doesn't use a Pen though and passes null instead. Using a Pen also really kills the performance on his sample. In the case of DrawLine I can't get around using one. –  wilford May 10 '11 at 7:12

Ok, playing around with it a bit more, I found that freezing the pen had a huge impact. Now I create the pen in the constructor like this:

public TestControl() {
    if (pen == null) {
        pen = new Pen(Brushes.Gray, 1.0);
        pen.Freeze();
    }
}

The performance is now as I would expect it to be. I knew it had to be something simple...

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Are you sure? It doesn't do anything in my test... However making it private instead of static does. –  Erno de Weerd May 10 '11 at 7:27
    
The pen in my sample is private (and static). I don't think visibility makes any difference, having 1 instance instead of thousands does though. It is strange that you don't see a difference in your test.. On my machine the redraw behaviour goes from completely unacceptable to realtime with this small change. –  wilford May 10 '11 at 7:39
    
Ah yes. I removed the static and just made it private only. Making it private and static (no freezing) degrades performance significantly. –  Erno de Weerd May 10 '11 at 7:43
    
I can confirm that freeze is really increasing performance for resizing. It also add speed for hit testing. We found it while trying to optimize our project where we draw about 1500 DrawingVisual(s). All of them participates in hit testing. –  Marat Khasanov May 10 '11 at 7:46
    
How is this when the Pen is defined as public static readonly (without freeze)? –  Gerard Nov 27 '14 at 14:42

Drawing in WPF becomes extremely slow if you use a pen with a dash style other than Solid (the default). This affects every draw method of DrawingContext that accepts a pen (DrawLine, DrawGeometry, etc.)

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My guess is that the call to rnd.Next(...) is causing a lot of overhead each render. You can test it by providing a constant and then compare the speeds.

Do you really need to generate new coordinates each render?

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Random.Next costs next to no time. I measured something like 150ns on my machine. –  Jens May 9 '11 at 15:03
    
Yes, as Jens said, Random.Next is harmless. In the real application the coordinates aren't random numbers and don't change every render, this was just for example's sake. –  wilford May 10 '11 at 7:09
    
Reading the Charles Petzold article (referred to by Doug): it states that 100K data points slowdown/break the app. When the application is 500 pixels wide and you have 100 controls you are at 50K data points. Resizing causes extra strain (lots of redraws) It's not a nice message but it seems as if you are reaching a limit here. –  Erno de Weerd May 10 '11 at 7:23

This question is really old but I found a way that improved the execution of my code which used DrawingContext.DrawLine aswell.

This was my code to draw a curve one hour ago:

DrawingVisual dv = new DrawingVisual();
DrawingContext dc = dv.RenderOpen();

foreach (SerieVM serieVm in _curve.Series) {
    Pen seriePen = new Pen(serieVm.Stroke, 1.0);
    Point lastDrawnPoint = new Point();
    bool firstPoint = true;
    foreach (CurveValuePointVM pointVm in serieVm.Points.Cast<CurveValuePointVM>()) {
        if (pointVm.XValue < xMin || pointVm.XValue > xMax) continue;

        double x = basePoint.X + (pointVm.XValue - xMin) * xSizePerValue;
        double y = basePoint.Y - (pointVm.Value - yMin) * ySizePerValue;
        Point coord = new Point(x, y);

        if (firstPoint) {
            firstPoint = false;
        } else {
            dc.DrawLine(seriePen, lastDrawnPoint, coord);
        }

        lastDrawnPoint = coord;
    }
}

dc.Close();

Here is the code now:

DrawingVisual dv = new DrawingVisual();
DrawingContext dc = dv.RenderOpen();

foreach (SerieVM serieVm in _curve.Series) {
    StreamGeometry g = new StreamGeometry();
    StreamGeometryContext sgc = g.Open();

    Pen seriePen = new Pen(serieVm.Stroke, 1.0);
    bool firstPoint = true;
    foreach (CurveValuePointVM pointVm in serieVm.Points.Cast<CurveValuePointVM>()) {
        if (pointVm.XValue < xMin || pointVm.XValue > xMax) continue;

        double x = basePoint.X + (pointVm.XValue - xMin) * xSizePerValue;
        double y = basePoint.Y - (pointVm.Value - yMin) * ySizePerValue;
        Point coord = new Point(x, y);

        if (firstPoint) {
            firstPoint = false;
            sgc.BeginFigure(coord, false, false);
        } else {
            sgc.LineTo(coord, true, false);
        }
    }

    sgc.Close();
    dc.DrawGeometry(null, seriePen, g);
}

dc.Close();

The old code would take ~ 140 ms to plot two curves of 3000 points. The new one takes about 5 ms. Using StreamGeometry seems to be much more efficient than DrawingContext.Drawline.

Edit: I'm using the dotnet framework version 3.5

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I'm pretty sure you could squeeze out even more performance by freezing your Pen and your StreamGeometry! –  wilford Oct 15 '14 at 8:23

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