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I am currently working in Ubuntu9.10 - c++. I need to define an generic object in a method. I have to define the method in .h file. How can I do it? I did the following:

file.h

class ana

{
//code
public:
template <class T>  bool method (T &Data);
};

file.cpp

//code

template <class T>
bool ana::method(T &Data)
{
//code
}

I've created the .a file.

In test.cpp:

//code
main()
{
    //code
    Ana* ann = new Ana();

    if (ann->method(*ann)){//code}
}

After compiling with g++ test.cpp -o test libfile.a I have the error: undefined reference to bool.... Why? Is there another way to create a generic object?

share|improve this question
3  
All the template code must go in the header. –  nbt May 9 '11 at 13:40
    
@unapersson, you should submit this as an answer, not a comment. –  Trent May 9 '11 at 13:42
2  
@Trent Actually, I should vote to close it as a dupe, but I can't be arsed finding one of the zillions of questions its a dupe of. –  nbt May 9 '11 at 13:45
1  
possible duplicate of Why can templates only be implemented in the header file? –  Robᵩ May 9 '11 at 14:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Putting function definitions together with declarations (in the header files itself) definitely helps and is the way of choice. But, in case you want to separate the function definitions, have the following lines at the end of the .cpp file. Its called explicit instantiation.This will take care of linker errors. I tried some code, and this seems to work, based on what you have given:

file.h:

#ifndef __ANA_H__
#define __ANA_H__

template <class T>
class ana {

  public: 
    bool method(T& data);
};

#endif

file.cpp:

#include <ana.h>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <typename T>
bool ana<T>::method(T& data) {
  cout << "Data = " << data << endl;
  if(data > 0) {
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}

//explicit instantiation for avoidance of g++ linker errors.
template
bool ana<int>::method(int& data);

template
bool ana<double>::method(double& data)

One of the downsides of using this method is that these lines will have to be included for every data type that you want this function to support. So, now the method function will run ONLY for int and double. The specs for your code should be such that method is never called for data types other than the above. HTH,
Sriram

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thx a lot Sriram. I am going to test it! –  linuxx May 9 '11 at 14:16
    
i am errors. error: expected "<" before bool. why? –  linuxx May 9 '11 at 14:17
    
@linuxx: I have edited my post and posted some code that works for me. –  Sriram May 9 '11 at 18:58
    
thx a lot Sriram1 –  linuxx May 10 '11 at 7:01
    
@linuxx: an upvote would be nice too ;) –  Sriram May 10 '11 at 7:13

The usual problem. Have a look: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/templates.html#faq-35.13.

Just put everything into a header file.

file.hpp

class ana
{
    //code
public:
    template <class T>  bool method (T &Data)
    {
        //code
    }
};

Include this in your main.cpp and it should work fine.

#include "file.hpp"
main()
{
    //code
    Ana* ann = new Ana();

    if (ann->method(*ann)){//code}
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It is poor practice to answer with just a link. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/8231/… –  Jordan May 9 '11 at 13:45
    
can you please tell me how to change the code i have? please?:) I am stack –  linuxx May 9 '11 at 13:47
    
I agree that it is poor practice. But I guess if I would use the search I would find this is a duplicate. Nevertheless thanks for the meta link. That was new to me. –  mkaes May 9 '11 at 13:56
    
i have the undefined error. why? –  linuxx May 9 '11 at 14:19
    
Works fine on my machine. Beside of the typo I copied from you that it must be lower cap ana* ann = new ana(); –  mkaes May 9 '11 at 14:35
  1. You forgot to build file.cpp into the binary.
  2. You should put the function template definition in the header, anyway.
share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean? where am i wrong? can you please rewrite my code? –  linuxx May 9 '11 at 13:46
    
i don't need to build the file.cpp because i build the .a file –  linuxx May 9 '11 at 13:48
    
@linuxx You can start by inlining the implementation of template <class T> bool method (T &Data), in the header. Also, it should be class Ana, not class ana. The main point is that the template method must be implemented in the header. –  juanchopanza May 9 '11 at 13:54
    
No for #1. For non-template functions, you provide the header and the compiled library, and you're fine. For template functions, the compiler has to be able to see the implementation at the point of use, and so it needs to be in the header, so whether file.cpp is in the binary or not is irrelevant. –  David Thornley May 9 '11 at 13:56
    
@David: I know. #2 subsumes #1. But #1 is a general error that he has made whilst under the assumption that the function definition goes in file.cpp: it was left out of the build altogether. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 9 '11 at 14:01

You need to change the definition of your method() method to be in the header file:

class ana
{
public:
    template <class T>
    bool method (T &Data)
    {
        // Do whatever you want in here
    }
};

Check the following link out for a detailed explanation - http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/templates.html#faq-35.12

share|improve this answer
    
Mark I am using the .h file just for declaring the method. I don't want to also define the method in the .h file . I am using file.cpp for this. –  linuxx May 9 '11 at 13:55
    
please help:). thx –  linuxx May 9 '11 at 13:58
    
You have to define the method in the header file, you don't have a choice :) –  Mark Ingram May 9 '11 at 14:05
    
how do i have to define it in the method file? please give me the full code. –  linuxx May 9 '11 at 14:19

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