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Though my question is pretty straightforward, I failed to find an answer around here:

How can I stub a method and return the parameter itself (for example on a method that does an array-operation)?

Something like this:

 interface.stub!(:get_trace).with(<whatever_here>).and_return(<whatever_here>)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 23 down vote accepted

stub! can accept a block. The block receives the parameters; the return value of the block is the return value of the stub:

class Interface
end

describe Interface do
  it "should have a stub that returns its argument" do
    interface = Interface.new
    interface.stub!(:get_trace) do |arg|
      arg
    end
    interface.get_trace(123).should eql 123
  end
end
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Thanks, this is exactly what I was looking for! I knew the answer had to be something simple :) –  SirLenz0rlot May 9 '11 at 15:55
    
@SirLenzOrlot, You're welcome! Thanks for the checkmark, and happy hacking. –  Wayne Conrad May 9 '11 at 16:15
    
Can this be combined with a situation where sequence plays a role (for example the first time it is called it returns the parameter, the next time it returns "disconnected")? –  SirLenz0rlot Oct 13 '11 at 12:35
    
@Sir, Yes, but it doesn't seem like the easy way to do things. Why not just spec that it should receive (for example) "foo" and return "foo", and then receive "bar" and return "disconnected?" –  Wayne Conrad Oct 14 '11 at 22:22
    
I've got two answers at stackoverflow.com/questions/7754733/… –  SirLenz0rlot Oct 17 '11 at 14:49

The stub method has been deprecated in favor of expect.

expect(object).to receive(:get_trace).with(anything) do |value| 
  value
end

https://relishapp.com/rspec/rspec-mocks/v/3-2/docs/configuring-responses/block-implementation

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