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Which one of the following two pieces of code should be preferred over other? and on what basis the decision should be taken generally?

MAX_LIMIT might vary from 1000 to 5000 in various calls of this function.

for (i=0;i<MAX_LIMIT;++i)
{
    for (j=0;j<MAX_LIMIT;++j)
    {
         anObj.setMatrix(i,j,0);
    }
}
for (i=0;i<MAX_LIMIT;++i)
{
    anObj.setMatrix(i,i,1);
}

vs

for (i=0;i<MAX_LIMIT;++i)
{
    for (j=0;j<MAX_LIMIT;++j)
    {
         if(i==j)
         {
             anObj.setMatrix(i,j,1);
         }
         else
         {
             anObj.setMatrix(i,j,0);
         }
    }
}

Thanks.

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both are setting a matrix in an object. if row == col, one is filled. otherwise zero is filled. same task is done in two ways. is that clear now? –  Azodious May 9 '11 at 14:21
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The second, which does what it says. However, I'd strongly prefer

for (i=0;i<MAX_LIMIT;++i)
{
    for (j=0;j<MAX_LIMIT;++j)
    {
         anObj.setMatrix(i, j, i==j ? 1 : 0);
    }
}
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Shouldn't i==j be enough? –  Yet Another Geek May 9 '11 at 14:27
    
The question is tagged C#, and in C# there's no implicit conversion between int and bool. –  mquander May 9 '11 at 14:28
    
i'm reading this article en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locality_of_reference. so does locality play any role here? –  Azodious May 9 '11 at 14:30
    
@Yet Another Geek: Not in C#: "Cannot implicitly convert type 'bool' to 'int'". –  Daniel Hilgarth May 9 '11 at 14:30
    
Not really, no, this should compile to the same thing as your second example, so there's no performance implication. I just prefer it because it's shorter and clearer -- the only difference when i==j is that you set a 1 instead of a 0, and this is the cleanest way to express that. –  mquander May 9 '11 at 14:33
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The perfomance of the two should be asymptoticaly equal, as both run in O(n^2). You should probably prefer the one with most readability.

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Are you sure? IMHO, the first example runs with O(n^2 + n). –  Daniel Hilgarth May 9 '11 at 14:21
    
Which is O(n^2), as O(n) is a proper subset of O(n^2). Proof O(n^2+n) = O(n^2) + O(n) = O(n^2) + O(n^2) = 2*O(n^2) = O(n^2) –  Yet Another Geek May 9 '11 at 14:23
    
Thanks. Could you explain the step from O(n^2) + O(n) to O(n^2) + O(n^2) or provide a link that explains these rules? –  Daniel Hilgarth May 9 '11 at 14:30
    
    
O(g(n)) for an algorithm f(n), means there exist a constant c such that for a given point n_0 > 0 then f(n) < c*g(n). And as in respect to the rules of inequality if there exist a g(n) < h(n) then O(g(n)) < O(h(n)). E.g. If f(n) is O(n) then f(n) is O(n^2) because f(n) < c*n < c*n^2. Link on wikipedia. –  Yet Another Geek May 9 '11 at 14:46
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In my opinion I would go with the second of the two. It is best to limit the number of times you have to loop through something. Since you're looking at at least O(n^2) runtime I would definately limity yourself to only 2 loops.

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Better for what? I think the second version is easiest to understand at a glance, although other people may have other opinions.

If you're interested in performance, it should be easy to time the two methods. (It may even be relevant.)

Taking a look at this for performance, I'd suspect the second method would be faster, because it will work through the array one cache line at a time. The first method will work through the array one cache line at a time, and then go on to execute N cache faults. My guess is that this is more significant than putting an extra conditional in the loop.

So, if array initialization takes a significant amount of time compared to other operations, and this matters, time each one and see. If not, then go with the more readable version.

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